Nuclear Issues

14 Items

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Testimony

U.S. and Russia Share a Vital Interest in Countering Terrorism

| September 30, 2015

Simon Saradzhyan testified before the U.S. House of Representatives' Europe, Eurasia, and Emerging Threats Subcommittee Hearing on "The Threat of Islamist Extremism in Russia," on September 30, 2015. 

In his testimony, Saradzhyan asked: "Can the United States and Russia cooperate against the threat posed by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and other international terrorist organizations, even though the bilateral relationship has deteriorated in the wake of the crisis in Ukraine? My answer is they can and they will if they act in their best interest."

Olli Heinonen delivering the keynote address at the 2014 JAEA International Forum, Tokyo, 3 Dec. 2014.

JAEA

Testimony

International Efforts for Ensuring Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Nonproliferation, and Expectations for Japan

| December 3, 2014

Senior fellow Olli Heinonen delivered the keynote speech at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency International Forum on ongoing proliferation concerns and the future of Japan's nuclear policy.

Policy Brief - Managing the Atom Project, Belfer Center

Smashing Atoms for Peace: Using Linear Accelerators to Produce Medical Isotopes without Highly Enriched Uranium

| October 2013

Accelerators can eventually be substituted for nuclear research reactors for the production of medical isotopes and for neutron-based research and other applications. The use of accelerators would reduce dependence on HEU and decrease the resulting risks. The United States and other countries should work together to provide the funding and exchange of information and ideas needed to speed up the development, demonstration, and deployment of technically and economically viable accelerator technologies to substitute for research reactors.

    Outside view of the UN building with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) office inside, at the International Center, in Vienna, Austria, June 8, 2012.

    AP Photo

    Policy Brief - Centre for International Governance Innovation

    Unleashing the Nuclear Watchdog: Strengthening and Reform of the IAEA

    | June 2012

    Published along with the report Unleashing the Nuclear Watchdog: Strengthening and Reform of the IAEA — the result of more than two years of research  and examining all aspects of the Agency's mandate and operations this policy brief summarizes the report's key findings and policy recommendations for strengthening and reforming the IAEA.

    A nuclear power plant in Beijing

    Bret Arnett, CC licensed

    Policy Brief

    China’s Nuclear Energy Industry, One Year After Fukushima

    | Mar. 05, 2012

    It has been one year since the disastrous nuclear accident at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011. Experts now view Fukushima as the worst nuclear accident since Chernobyl in 1986.

    In the aftermath, the Chinese government promptly reaffirmed that nation’s nuclear energy policy. Yet China also became the only nation among all major nuclear energy states that suspended its new nuclear plant project approvals. Before it would restart approvals, China said it would:

    1) Conduct safety inspections at all nuclear facilities

    2) Strengthen the approval process of new nuclear plant projects

    3) Enact a new national nuclear safety plan

    4) Adjust the medium and long-term development plan for nuclear power

    Where is China on this path, and what is the future of its nuclear power industry?

    Policy Brief - Quarterly Journal: International Security

    Nuclear Policy Gridlock in Japan

      Author:
    • Jacques E.C. Hymans
    | November 2011

    The historical growth in the number and variety of Japanese nuclear veto players has made the country an extreme case of stasis in fundamental nuclear policies. Japan is not the only country to experience this phenomenon, however. In many advanced industrialized democracies, the old Manhattan Project model of top-down, centralized, and secretive nuclear institutions has gradually given way to more complex arrangements. And as a general rule, the more numerous the veto players, the harder the struggle to achieve major nuclear policy change.

    Policy Brief - Energy Technology Innovation Policy Project, Belfer Center

    Research, Development, and Demonstration for the Future of Nuclear Energy

    | June 2011

    Dramatic growth in nuclear energy would be required for nuclear power to provide a significant part of the carbon-free energy the world is likely to need in the 21st century, or a major part in meeting other energy challenges. This would require increased support from governments, utilities, and publics around the world. Achieving that support is likely to require improved economics and major progress toward resolving issues of nuclear safety, proliferation-resistance, and nuclear waste management. This is likely to require both research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) of improved technologies and new policy approaches.