Nuclear Issues

393 Items

Iranian parliamentarians dressing in IRGC uniforms to demonstrate solidarity  following the Trump administration's terrorist designation of the organization.

IRNA

Analysis & Opinions

The Iran–U.S. Escalation: Causes and Prospects

| June 09, 2019

Despite the continuing debate in Tehran, the principle of “no negotiation under pressure” with the United States remains a consensual principle among all members of the current regime. The Supreme Leader has expressed this position by stating that the negotiations with the Trump administration are “double poison”. While Iran’s regional enemies are pushing for confrontation, the international community remains supportive of Tehran’s political position, as long as it stays committed to the nuclear deal. Existing indicators do not point at any willingness for confrontation from either side – at least at the moment. And although some regional actors have attempted to pacify the tension, the prospects for a truce remain unlikely within the current context.

Steam billowing from cooling tower of nuclear power plant

AP Photo/David Veis/CTK

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Proliferation and the Logic of the Nuclear Market

| Spring 2019

What explains the scale and speed of nuclear proliferation? One key factor is the level of competition among suppliers in the market for nuclear materials and technologies. When suppliers form a cartel, fewer countries can acquire what they need for a nuclear weapons program. If great power competition intensifies, suppliers will find it harder to cooperate and nuclear proliferation could accelerate.

The nuclear archive warehouse outside Tehran (Satellite image via Google).

Satellite image via Google

Report - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The Iran Nuclear Archive: Impressions and Implications

In mid-January, a team of scholars from the Belfer Center’s Intelligence and Managing the Atom Projects traveled to Tel Aviv, Israel to examine samples of, and receive briefings on, an archive of documents related to Iran’s nuclear weapons program. The large cache includes some 55,000 pages of documents and a further 55,000 files on CDs that included photos and videos. A clandestine Israeli intelligence operation spirited the materials out of Iran in early 2018.

The documents that the Belfer group were shown confirm that senior Iranian officials had decided in the late 1990s to actually manufacture nuclear weapons and carry out an underground nuclear test; that Iran’s program to do so made more technical progress than had previously been understood; and that Iran had help from quite a number of foreign scientists, and access to several foreign nuclear weapon designs. The archive also leaves open a wide range of questions, including what plan, if any, Iran has had with respect to nuclear weapons in the nearly 16 years since Iran’s government ordered a halt to most of the program in late 2003. 

This brief report summarizes the group’s conclusions about what the archive reveals about Iran’s program and questions that remain open.

Ambassador Nicholas Burns Speaks to CNBC About U.S.-North Korean Relations

CNBC

Analysis & Opinions - CNBC

You Have to Question Preparation That Went into Trump-Kim Summit, Says Pro

| Feb. 28, 2019

CNBC's "Closing Bell" team discusses the outcome of President Trump's meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un with Nicholas Burns, Harvard Kennedy School professor and former under secretary of state for political affairs, and Christopher Hill, University of Denver professor and former U.S. ambassador to South Korea.

U.S. President Donald Trump Meets North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un in Vietnam

Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - WBUR

WBUR - February 28, 2019: Hour 1

| Feb. 28, 2019

The summit between President Trump and North Korea's Kim Jong Un ended Thursday without any deal. We discuss the implications with Nicholas Burns, former U.S. ambassador to NATO and a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Also, Ed Burke, the dean of Chicago's City Council, was re-elected Tuesday to his 13th term in office, just weeks after FBI agents raided his offices. Burke has come to symbolize for some just how entrenched Chicago is in a culture of corruption.