Nuclear Issues

385 Items

Trump Wouldn’t Owe Putin a ‘Thank You’ for Selling More Oil

Kremlin.ru/Wikimedia Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Bloomberg Opinion

Trump Wouldn’t Owe Putin a ‘Thank You’ for Selling More Oil

| July 14, 2018

After a tumultuous week of unpredictable twists and turns during President Donald Trump’s visit to Europe, anxiety levels have risen among experts and policy makers about the coming summit between Trump and President Vladimir Putin. As President Trump himself has noted, there is no shortage of issues demanding the attention of the two leaders: Syria, Iran, arms control and — who knows — maybe even Russia’s interference in America’s elections. But energy could snake its way onto the agenda, and Trump needs to be careful not to give Putin concessions in exchange for something the Russian president already plans on doing.

Dr. Gary Samore, Ambassadors Danny Russel and Chris Hill, and Dr. John Park offer their insights on U.S.-North Korean relations. 

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

News - Harvard Kennedy School

Dealing With North Korea: Insights From U.S. Negotiators

    Author:
  • Nora Delaney
| June 21, 2018

The historic summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore this month (June 12) has drawn both skepticism and optimism from experts. A panel of senior American and South Korean diplomats with experience negotiating with North Korea weighed in at an event hosted by the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs’ Korea Working Group on Tuesday (June 19).

President Donald Trump meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Sentosa Island on Tuesday, June 12, 2018, in Singapore.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Analysis & Opinions - METRO U.N.

The Singapore Summit: Relief and Triple Shock

| June 20, 2018

Europeans share the world-wide relief that after apocalyptic threats of war the Singapore summit between President Trump and Kim Jong-un has dramatically lowered tensions on the Korean Peninsula and thus for the time being avoided a conflict that would have horrible consequences for Koreans, Japanese and Americans, indeed for the entire world. Diplomacy is back and both sides are now committed to negotiations toward an agreement on peace and the denuclearization of North Korea.

Nonetheless, the summit has caused a triple shock in Europe.

US President Donald J. Trump walked with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un at the Capella Hotel on Sentosa island in Singapore on June 12

Korean Central News Agency via Reuters

Analysis & Opinions - Atlantic Council

Beyond the Trump-Kim Summit: A Coalition is Critical for Achieving Denuclearization

| June 16, 2018

In the wake of US President Donald J. Trump’s June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, R. Nicholas Burns, an Atlantic Council board member who served as US undersecretary of state from 2005 to 2008, discussed the tough work that lies ahead and lessons from a not too distant past.

Burns spoke in a phone interview with the New Atlanticist’s Ashish Kumar Sen. Here are excerpts from our interview.

Trump and Kim at summit

AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Grading the Singapore Summit: Compared to What?

| June 15, 2018

In the hyperpolarized state of American politics and policy debate, both critics and supporters of the Trump administration have become so predictable that they are now background noise. If required to summarize my assessment of the Trump-Kim summit in one line, it would be: oversold and undervalued. Despite their best efforts, his critics haven’t come close to matching Trump’s preposterous claim that “There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea.”