18 Items

In this combination of file photos, U.S. President Donald Trump, left, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington on May 16, 2018, and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in a meeting with South Korean leader Moon Jae-in in Panmunjom, South Korea, on April 27, 2018. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Korea Summit Press Pool via AP, File)

AP Photo/Evan Vucci, Korea Summit Press Pool via AP, File

Analysis & Opinions - Politico Magazine

How to Tell If the North Korea Talks Are a Success

| June 07, 2018

While President Donald Trump prepares for his planned June 12 summit with Kim Jong Un, questions abound about the historic talks. When it comes to North Korea’s nuclear program, what is really on the table? What’s the United States willing to give up in return? And, most crucially, what would a successful deal with North Korea look like?

In this April 27, 2018 file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, left, and South Korean President Moon Jae-in shake hands after signing on a joint statement at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone, South Korea. (Korea Summit Press Pool via AP)

Korea Summit Press Pool via AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Don't Get Too Excited About the Korea Summit. There's a Lot of Work to Do.

| Apr. 27, 2018

We should all be glad that Kim Jong Un, the leader of North Korea, and Moon Jae-in, the president of South Korea, had a positive summit — and that Kim literally took a historic step into the South, as did Moon, briefly, into the North. Dialogue is certainly better than a march to war. That said, we all need to keep our expectations in check.

President Donald Trump speaks in the Cabinet Room of the White House on Sept. 12, 2017 (AP Photo/Alex Brandon).

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

Trump Is Going to Make a Huge Mistake on the Iran Deal

| Oct. 09, 2017

The Trump administration is right that Iranian behavior destabilizes the region, but wrong when it says that such behavior contradicts the “spirit” of the agreement and that he is therefore justified in refusing to certify Iran’s compliance. In fact, Iran’s troubling foreign policy is precisely why the deal was necessary in the first place: An Iran armed with a nuclear weapon would be far more threatening to regional and global security.

In this Dec. 8, 2012 photo, Chinese paramilitary policemen build a fence near a concrete marker depicting the North Korean and Chinese national flags with the words “China North Korea Border” at a crossing in the Chinese border town of Tumen in eastern China’s Jilin province. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File

Policy Brief

Peace and Prosperity on the Korean Peninsula

    Authors:
  • Hyun-Kyung Kim
  • Joy Li
  • Patrick Mayoh
  • Tom O'Bryan
    Editor:
  • Diana Park
| May 2017

North Korea is the most difficult and dangerous challenge facing the U.S. today. Pyongyang is on the path to developing a nuclear missile delivery system that could strike the United States. In fact, since 2013, the country has followed Kim Jong Un’s version of his grandfather’s “byungjin policy”, which stipulates that simultaneous nuclear expansion and economic development are necessary for the regime’s survival. North Korea shows no signs of abandoning its nuclear ambitions, which pose a mounting strategic threat to the Asia-Pacific region; the alternatives to a peaceful resolution are even more harrowing. Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula will require all stakeholders in Northeast Asia—South Korea, Japan, the United States, and especially China—to cooperate on measures that could help precipitate North Korea’s return to the negotiating table.

Audio - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Wendy Sherman on Office Hours Podcast

| Apr. 03, 2017

Former Undersecretary of State Wendy Sherman, a lead negotiator of the P5+1 Iran Nuclear deal and a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Belfer Center, talks with Aroop Mukharji (@aroopmukharji) about her place in history as the first female Undersecretary of State, Vladimir Putin’s sense of humor, and how many snacks it takes to fuel a negotiating team.