17 Items

China's maritime claim (red) and UNCLOS exclusive economic zones (blue) in the South China Sea.

Wikimedia Commons

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

How Much Risk Should the United States Run in the South China Sea?

| Fall 2022

China’s increasingly assertive behavior in the South China Sea suggests that it wants to dominate that critical area of the globe. How should the United States respond? This article presents three policy options: increase military resistance to Chinese pressure; partially retrench to protect U.S. allies; and maintain current policy, continuing to recognize that U.S. interests in the area are limited.

Environmental activists wear masks depicting world leaders during the G-20 Summit in Japan

(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The G-20 Is Discussing the "International Liberal Order." That’s a Bad Place to Start a Debate.

| June 28, 2019

The Group of 20 is starting its meeting in Osaka, Japan. According to Japan’s foreign minister, the “highest priority” of the meeting will be to support the liberal international order, which he claims is under threat. However, defending the liberal international order is not as uncontroversial as it seems at first glance.

Flags of member states outside NATO headquarters

Alexey Vitvitsky/Sputnik via AP

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

A Flawed Framework: Why the Liberal International Order Concept Is Misguided

| Spring 2019

Maintaining the liberal international order is central in the debate over U.S. security and foreign policy. Much of what the liberal order purports to explain, however, can be explained by other theories. Analyzing issues through a grand-strategic lens would provide broader options for achieving U.S. interests.

Soldiers stand on guard next to a Chinese navy nuclear submarine at the Qingdao base in east China's Shandong province on August 19, 2013.

Yin Haiyang/ AP

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Should the United States Reject MAD? Damage Limitation and U.S. Nuclear Strategy toward China

| Summer 2016

China's growing nuclear arsenal threatens to erode the United States' damage-limitation capability—its ability to destroy Chinese forces and thereby significantly reduce the damage that an all-out Chinese nuclear attack would inflict on the United States. Nevertheless, the United States should not attempt to preserve this capability. Doing so is technologically infeasible, would not add to the U.S. nuclear deterrent, would heighten tensions with China, and would increase the risk of nuclear escalation in a crisis.

Taiwan on a map.

Kin Hang Norman Chan

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

A U.S.-China Grand Bargain? The Hard Choice between Military Competition and Accommodation

| Spring 2015

China's growing military power has fueled a security competition with the United States, increasing the risk of war between the two countries. To reduce this likelihood, the United States and China should negotiate a grand bargain in which the United States ends its commitment to defend Taiwan, and China agrees to resolve its maritime territorial disputes peacefully and accepts the United States' long-term military presence in East Asia.