7 Items

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Audio - International Security

Podcast: David Ekbladh

| Jan. 04, 2012

Edward Mead Earle was a historian, scholar, professor, and international relations expert; he was also a founding father of the field we know as Security Studies. David Ekbladh and Lynn-Jones discuss Earle's contributions to the field, his views on what Security Studies should be, his seminar at the Institute for Advanced Study, and what he might think of Security Studies today.

Audio - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Podcast: The Foundation of Security Studies

| Jan. 04, 2012

Edward Mead Earle was a historian, scholar, professor, and international relations expert; he was also a founding father of the field we know as Security Studies.

David Ekbladh and Sean Lynn-Jones discuss Earle's contributions to the field, his views on what Security Studies should be, his seminar at the Institute for Advanced Study, and what he might think of Security Studies today.

U.S. Army Air Force Gen. Carl A. Spaatz (left) congratulated Edward Meade Earle on his receipt of the Presidential Medal for Merit in 1946.

U.S. Army A.A.F. Photo

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Present at the Creation: Edward Mead Earle and the Depression-Era Origin of Security Studies

| Winter 2011/12

Security studies is commonly thought to have emerged as a response to the Cold War, but its roots reach much further back. Historian Edward Mead Earle and his colleagues first addressed the problem of security to cope with the unraveling of the international order in the 1930s. Earle was instrumental in paving the way for security studies as it exists today, laying the foundations for an important discipline that seeks to combine history, economics, and political science to build bridges between the government and academia and use scientific inquiry to inform policy and guide grand strategy.

Discussion Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

A Pillar's Progress: How Development's History Shapes U.S. Options in the Present

| May 2010

With the attacks of September 11, 2001, and the "War on Terror" that followed, development aid was shoved back into the spotlight. Many ideas and institutions that had lain dormant in international affairs, insinuated their return into U.S. strategy and the agenda of the international community. "Nation building" in Afghanistan and Iraq along with a hope that development would stifle the appeal of extremist ideologies and the movements that they stirred has returned development to a prominent place in U.S. grand strategy.

This night view shows the Norris Dam rising from the Clinch River in Norris, Tenn., July 22, 1935. Powerful spotlights placed on and above the dam enable construction work to continue night and day of the Tennessee Valley Authority's project.

AP Photo

Journal Article - International History Review

Meeting the Challenge from Totalitarianism: The Tennessee Valley Authority as a Global Model for Liberal Development, 1933–1945

| March 2010

"...[T]he rivalry between models of socio-economic development did not begin with the cold war. During the Depression, liberals sought to show that planned economic and social development was possible without the use of autocratic methods. Liberal internationalists, aware that their totalitarian ideological competitors offered their own attractive modernization programmes needed a liberal champion. In the TVA they found a global model that became nearly synonymous with liberal development because of its claim to harmonize potentially destabilizing forces. At a time when development models were features of the international discourse, the TVA distinguished itself by offering proof that large-scale, socially transformative, planning-based development was viable in a liberal democracy. The ease with which these ideas supplied an ideological strategy during the cold war illustrated the degree to which modernization had already proved its effectiveness as a weapon against ideological challenges to liberalism."

Book - Princeton University Press

The Great American Mission: Modernization and the Construction of an American World Order

| November 2009

The Great American Mission traces how America's global modernization efforts during the twentieth century were a means to remake the world in its own image. David Ekbladh shows that the emerging concept of modernization combined existing development ideas from the Depression. He describes how ambitious New Deal programs like the Tennessee Valley Authority became symbols of American liberalism's ability to marshal the social sciences, state planning, civil society, and technology to produce extensive social and economic change. For proponents, it became a valuable weapon to check the influence of menacing ideologies such as Fascism and Communism.

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Muddling Through: How Development's Past Shapes Its Future

| November 4, 2009

International development is back. President Barack Obama has given it significance in U.S. strategy not seen since the Cold War. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton's much touted "Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review," emphasizes her own belief that it is, "a core pillar of American power."