3 Items

The flag of the European Union

Richard Revel

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

A Call for Realism in Europe

| May 27, 2018

Strategic thought in Europe is underdeveloped. Hard power and military force remain beyond the scope of many Europeans. That is a problem because the extent to which Europeans can understand the world determines the extent to which they can exert influence. The United States are in a relative decline and there is no guarantee that Washington will protect Europe against the rise of China, the threat from Russia, and/or the instability from the Middle East. Europe will have to stand upon its own feet and take responsibility for its own fate. Doing so not only requires significant investment in military resources, but also a renaissance of European realist thought.

People watch a TV screen showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump, left, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, March 9, 2018.

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Why the United States Might Accept a Nuclear North Korea

| Mar. 22, 2018

Many Americans were aghast at President Trump’s announcement this month that he would meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.

But in moving toward diplomacy, Trump is following in the steps of previous presidents. If he continues down their path, the end result would be a deal that allows Pyongyang to keep its nuclear weapons — not because Trump gets taken in by Kim, but because such a deal boosts American interests. Since World War II, the United States has labored to prevent nuclear weapons from spreading. But once a country has them, Washington ultimately accommodates it, opting to develop some kind of diplomatic influence, if not control, over other nuclear powers, instead of going to war.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Elmar Hellendoorn: U.S. Nuclear Strategy and the Protection of Europe

    Author:
  • Jonathan Edel-Hänni
| Spring 2018

While his grammar school classmates gleefully followed sports cars and soccer stars, Elmar Hellendoorn would get excited about the newest airplanes and tanks. No surprise, growing up next to a U.S. airbase in Soesterberg, Netherlands. "F-15s were always flying over and as a young kid you would stand on a hill so you could see the planes taking off," he recalled.