480 Items

This photo taken through a glass window of a military plane shows China's alleged on-going reclamation of Mischief Reef in the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea on Monday, May 11, 2015. As China builds artificial islands in a vast resource-rich South China Sea, neighbors in Southeast Asia brace for possible conflict.(Ritchie B. Tongo/Pool Photo via AP)

Ritchie B. Tongo/Pool Photo via AP

Newspaper Article - The National Journal

The “Trap” of a U.S.-China War

    Author:
  • Charlie Cook
| Jan. 29, 2018

It isn’t often that a book comes along that should be mandatory reading for every member of Congress, Cabinet member and, for that matter, any senior governmental official with a connection to foreign policy and national security. But Graham Allison’s Destined for War: Can America and China Escape Thucydides’s Trap? is such a book.

Graham Allison, Professor of Government at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School, listens during an event in Boston on  February 5, 2013. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)

AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File

News - Le Monde

Graham Allison, ce Politologue qui Éclaire Notre Monde Grâce à la Grèce Antique

    Author:
  • Arnaud Leparmentier
| Jan. 05, 2018

Dans un essai récent, best-seller  outre-Atlantique, ce professeur émérite à Harvard examine la rivalité entre la Chine et les Etats-Unis à la lumière de l’Histoire : les deux puissances peuvent-elles échapper au « piège de Thucydide » ?

In this Oct. 16, 2016, file photo, a man in Seoul, South Korea watches a TV news program showing an image of a missile launch conducted by North Korea. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File)

AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon, File

Newspaper Article - The New York Times

Is Nuclear War Inevitable?

| Dec. 28, 2017

Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un trading threats with words like “fire and fury”; Pakistan deploying tactical nuclear weapons to counter Indian conventional threats; Russia enunciating an Orwellian doctrine of “escalate-to-de-escalate” that calls for early use of battlefield nuclear weapons; and major nuclear-weapons states modernizing their arsenals — nukes are back. The cruel irony: This is happening after eight years of a president who won the Nobel Peace Prize largely for his vision of a world free of nuclear weapons.

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- US-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: September - November 2017

  • Elbe Group members participate in Moscow conference.
  • U.S. and Russian experts weigh in on North Korea’s nuclear missile program, call for preservation of the nuclear deal with Iran.
  • NNSA Reports that some nuclear security cooperation with Russia is continuing.
  • Saradzhyan testifies on potential for U.S.-Russian counter-terrorism cooperation.
  • Bunn and Roth ponder effects of a nuclear terrorist bomb explosion.

China's President Xi Jinping delivers a toast at a state dinner at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Nov. 9, 2017 (Thomas Peter/Pool Photo via AP).

Thomas Peter/Pool Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - New Statesman

The Chairman of Everything: Why Chinese President Xi Jinping Will Change History

| Dec. 04, 2017

Xi is now not only the most powerful leader of China since Mao. He is also the most ambitious leader of any country today. In the past five years, he has proved himself the most effective in advancing his nation’s position in the world. And among all of the competitors on the international stage, he is the most likely to leave a lasting mark on history.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Iran: Insight and Thoughts on the Iran Nuclear Agreement

Graham Allison, Laura Holgate, Payam Mohseni, Gary Samore, Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall, Ariane Tabatabai, William Tobey, and Jon Wolfsthal provide insight and thoughts on the Iran Nuclear Agreement.

U.S. President Donald Trump, left, reacts as Chinese President Xi Jinping waves to business delegates during a business event at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday, November 9, 2017. Trump is on a five-country trip through Asia traveling to Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP Photo/Andy Wong

Analysis & Opinions - Politico

Will Trump and Xi ‘Solve’ North Korea?

| Nov. 08, 2017

The centerpiece of President Trump’s conversation with Chinese President Xi Jinping on Thursday will doubtless be North Korea. Before their first meeting in April, Trump’s message to Xi was unmistakable: You solve this problem, or I will, and you won’t like the way I do it. Then, just after he served Xi and his wife chocolate cake at Mar-a-Lago, Trump excused himself and went to an adjacent room to announce that the U.S. was launching 59 cruise missiles against Syria. Message: I’m serious.