14 Items

In this photo, taken on March 22, 2018 Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman meets with U.S. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis at the Pentagon in Washington.

AP Photo/Cliff Owen

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

The Saudi Crown Prince’s Uncertain Fate

| Oct. 23, 2018

The looming question in U.S.-Saudi relations: Can the crown prince retain unchecked authority in the Kingdom? And if he does, can the U.S.-Saudi relationship—including close cooperation on Gulf security and global oil policy and large infusions of Saudi money into U.S. Treasury bills—remain undamaged? In short, can King Salman retain his son as crown prince and the U.S. as a close ally?

Photo of Khalid Al-Falih, Minister of Energy, Industry and Mineral Resources and the OPEC Secretary General of Nigeria speak to journalists prior to a meeting of OPED in Nov. 2017

(AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Rising Oil Prices Are Bad News for Saudi Arabia

| Sep. 26, 2018

Oil prices are on their way up. Iranian sales have declined under pressure of a U.S. embargo. Venezuelan production is disintegrating apace with the country. Saudi production is nearing its limit, and the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries shows no sign of increasing production. Brent crude futures topped $80 a barrel Tuesday and may reach $100 before the end of the year.

Good news for oil-rich Saudi Arabia? In the very short run the answer is yes. But an increase in oil revenue only compounds the kingdom’s larger problems of economic and social malaise.

Saudi Arabia Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, left, gestures while speaking to Russian President Vladimir Putin during their meeting in Moscow, Russia, June 14, 2018. (Yuri Kadobnov, Pool Photo via AP)

Yuri Kadobnov, Pool Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

The Model for a Saudi Reformer

| July 17, 2018

As Mohammed bin Salman begins his second year as crown prince and de facto ruler of Saudi Arabia, it becomes clearer that his role model is his paternal grandfather, Abdul Aziz al Saud. The uncanny similarity between these two young rulers, a century apart, offers clear clues to the country's direction today.

Aziza Yousef drives a car on a highway in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving. The ban is expected to end in June 2018. March 29, 2014. (Hasan Jamali/Associated Press, File). Keywords: Aziza Yousef, Saudi driving ban

Hasan Jamali/Associated Press, File

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

Saudi Reforms Get a Boost From Google

| Feb. 04, 2018

Since Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman announced his intention to transform this country nearly two years ago, Saudis and foreigners alike have questioned whether he is serious or merely enjoying power. The time for doubt is over. Last week’s news that Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is in talks to build a tech hub in the kingdom is only the latest sign. Look for more such initiatives when the crown prince visits the U.S. in early March.

In this photo released by the Saudi Press Agency, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, center, and Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Christine Lagarde, left, attend the opening ceremony of Future Investment Initiative Conference in Riyadh, on Oct. 24, 2017 (Saudi Press Agency via AP).

Saudi Press Agency via AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

The Strategy Behind the Saudi Strife

| Nov. 06, 2017

Change is accelerating in Saudi Arabia. Over the weekend King Salman bin Abdulaziz removed his predecessor’s powerful son as head of the national guard. The king detained 11 princes along with current and former ministers on corruption charges. Behind the move is Saudi Arabia’s young reformer, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. He is gambling that the moves will be seen at home and abroad as cleansing the kingdom of tarnished old ways—not as the whim of an authoritarian ruler.

Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman arrives at the Hangzhou Exhibition Center to participate in G20 Summit, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016 in Hangzhou, China.

Etienne Oliveau / Pool Photo via AP

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Saudi Arabia in Transition

| July 2017

Saudi Arabia is like an obese man disfigured from decades of gluttony and idleness. Dieting is painful given his body’s cravings. Even the small exertion of walking is more unpleasant. And the inability to imagine that his sacrifice and suffering eventually will lead to good health makes it easy to revert to old habits. If, however, he will just push through the pain, good health and a better life are attainable.

In this Wednesday, June 21 , 2017 photo released by Al-Ekhbariya, Mohammed bin Salman, newly appointed as crown prince, left, kisses the hand of Prince Mohammed bin Nayef at royal palace in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia's King Salman on Wednesday appointed his 31-year-old son Mohammed bin Salman as crown prince, placing him first-in-line to the throne and removing the country's counterterrorism czar and a figure well-known to Washington from the line of succession. (Al-Ekhbariya via AP)

Al-Ekhbariya via AP

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

This Is Not Your Father’s Saudi Arabia

| June 21, 2017

"The appointment of Mohammad bin Salman, 31, as Saudi Arabia’s next king will accelerate his radical reform and further solidify the U.S.-Saudi partnership. King Salman’s long-anticipated decision to name his son crown prince almost certainly is intended to present a unified face to the kingdom’s adversaries, especially Iran—and to bolster U.S. support for a more assertive Riyadh."

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry chats with Deputy Crown Prince and Defense Minister Mohammad bin Salman after he arrived at Andrews Air Force Base in Camp Springs, Maryland, on September 3, 2015

U.S. Department of State

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

Saudi Society Dips a Toe Into the 21st Century

| November 2, 2016

“Welcome to the new Saudi Arabia,” says the youthful minister of the country’s newly minted Ministry of Entertainment. We are sitting in darkness watching the LED-lit bodies of New York dancers gyrating on an arena stage to deafening hip-hop music. Behind us, some 1,300 Saudis of all ages—robed men and abaya-covered women sitting side by side—are whooping their approval.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Q&A: Improving U.S.-Saudi Dynamics

| Summer 2016

We asked two Belfer Center experts on Saudi Arabia to tell us what should be done to improve the strained relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia. Nawaf Obaid, a visiting fellow at the Center, served until recently as special counselor to Prince Mohammed bin Nawaf and previously was special advisor for strategic communications to Prince Turki Al Faisal. Karen Elliott House, a senior fellow at the Belfer Center, is a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter and editor and former publisher at The Wall Street Journal. She is the author of On Saudi Arabia: Its People, Past, Religion, Fault Lines—and Future, published in September 2012.