10 Items

Aziza Yousef drives a car on a highway in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, as part of a campaign to defy Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving. The ban is expected to end in June 2018. March 29, 2014. (Hasan Jamali/Associated Press, File). Keywords: Aziza Yousef, Saudi driving ban

Hasan Jamali/Associated Press, File

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Saudi Reforms Get a Boost From Google

| Feb. 04, 2018

Since Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman announced his intention to transform this country nearly two years ago, Saudis and foreigners alike have questioned whether he is serious or merely enjoying power. The time for doubt is over. Last week’s news that Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is in talks to build a tech hub in the kingdom is only the latest sign. Look for more such initiatives when the crown prince visits the U.S. in early March.

In this photo released by the Saudi Press Agency, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, center, and Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund Christine Lagarde, left, attend the opening ceremony of Future Investment Initiative Conference in Riyadh, on Oct. 24, 2017 (Saudi Press Agency via AP).

Saudi Press Agency via AP

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

The Strategy Behind the Saudi Strife

| Nov. 06, 2017

Change is accelerating in Saudi Arabia. Over the weekend King Salman bin Abdulaziz removed his predecessor’s powerful son as head of the national guard. The king detained 11 princes along with current and former ministers on corruption charges. Behind the move is Saudi Arabia’s young reformer, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. He is gambling that the moves will be seen at home and abroad as cleansing the kingdom of tarnished old ways—not as the whim of an authoritarian ruler.

Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman arrives at the Hangzhou Exhibition Center to participate in G20 Summit, Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016 in Hangzhou, China.

Etienne Oliveau / Pool Photo via AP

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Saudi Arabia in Transition

| July 2017

Saudi Arabia is like an obese man disfigured from decades of gluttony and idleness. Dieting is painful given his body’s cravings. Even the small exertion of walking is more unpleasant. And the inability to imagine that his sacrifice and suffering eventually will lead to good health makes it easy to revert to old habits. If, however, he will just push through the pain, good health and a better life are attainable.

In this Wednesday, June 21 , 2017 photo released by Al-Ekhbariya, Mohammed bin Salman, newly appointed as crown prince, left, kisses the hand of Prince Mohammed bin Nayef at royal palace in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia's King Salman on Wednesday appointed his 31-year-old son Mohammed bin Salman as crown prince, placing him first-in-line to the throne and removing the country's counterterrorism czar and a figure well-known to Washington from the line of succession. (Al-Ekhbariya via AP)

Al-Ekhbariya via AP

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

This Is Not Your Father’s Saudi Arabia

| June 21, 2017

"The appointment of Mohammad bin Salman, 31, as Saudi Arabia’s next king will accelerate his radical reform and further solidify the U.S.-Saudi partnership. King Salman’s long-anticipated decision to name his son crown prince almost certainly is intended to present a unified face to the kingdom’s adversaries, especially Iran—and to bolster U.S. support for a more assertive Riyadh."

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry chats with Deputy Crown Prince and Defense Minister Mohammad bin Salman after he arrived at Andrews Air Force Base in Camp Springs, Maryland, on September 3, 2015

U.S. Department of State

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Saudi Society Dips a Toe Into the 21st Century

| November 2, 2016

“Welcome to the new Saudi Arabia,” says the youthful minister of the country’s newly minted Ministry of Entertainment. We are sitting in darkness watching the LED-lit bodies of New York dancers gyrating on an arena stage to deafening hip-hop music. Behind us, some 1,300 Saudis of all ages—robed men and abaya-covered women sitting side by side—are whooping their approval.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Q&A: Improving U.S.-Saudi Dynamics

| Summer 2016

We asked two Belfer Center experts on Saudi Arabia to tell us what should be done to improve the strained relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia. Nawaf Obaid, a visiting fellow at the Center, served until recently as special counselor to Prince Mohammed bin Nawaf and previously was special advisor for strategic communications to Prince Turki Al Faisal. Karen Elliott House, a senior fellow at the Belfer Center, is a Pulitzer Prize winning reporter and editor and former publisher at The Wall Street Journal. She is the author of On Saudi Arabia: Its People, Past, Religion, Fault Lines—and Future, published in September 2012.

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

The 30-Year-Old Saudi Revolutionary

| May 11, 2016

It is testing time for the House of Saud. Until last year, the monarchy had been treading water for half a century under the leadership of the increasingly aged and infirm sons of its founder, Abdul Aziz ibn Saud. Then a 29-year-old grandson, Mohammed bin Salman, was named deputy crown prince by his father, King Salman, and put in charge of the economy, national defense and the Saudi oil giant, Aramco. In late January, on the anniversary of his ascension to power, he began opening the curtains on his sweeping vision to transform his country -- and his countrymen.

Inside the Turmoil of Change in the House of Saud

commons.wikimedia.org

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Inside the Turmoil of Change in the House of Saud

| February 5, 2016

Can an audacious young prince make his tradition-bound family bow to his will and force his somnolent society to wake up? With the sweeping powers recently bestowed on 30-year-old Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, the Saudi royal family, its 30 million subjects and the outside world may soon find out.

Obama Pours Gas on the Mideast Fire

NASA

Analysis & Opinions - Wall Street Journal

Obama Pours Gas on the Mideast Fire

| July 16, 2015

While President Obama hopes his nuclear deal with Iran will burnish his presidential legacy as a great peacemaker, the near-term consequence will be more—and even bloodier—sectarian violence in the Middle East. In particular, security threats will escalate for Saudi Arabia and Israel, until now America’s two major Mideast allies.

The Israelis and Saudis, longtime adversaries, in recent years have joined in vehement opposition to Mr. Obama’s attempts to negotiate a nuclear deal with Tehran. For the Israelis the concern was entirely about an Iranian atomic weapon. But for the Saudis the fear was less about future nuclear capability than about the real and present threat that a deal would further enhance Iran’s regional stature and its capability to ratchet up the regime’s exploitation of regional sectarian divisions.