29 Items

Rupert Murdoch attends the WSJ Magazine 2017 Innovator Awards at The Museum of Modern Art on Wednesday on November 1, 2017, in New York.

Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Analysis & Opinions - Sydney Morning Herald

'Culture of Fear': Murdoch, the ABC and How to Fix a Media in Crisis

| Oct. 02, 2018

So what should be done about the rolling crises washing over what remains of the Australian media? Rupert Murdoch has been up to his neck in the elevation and removal of Australian prime ministers for the better part of a decade. The ABC has seen the conservatives politicise its board, demolish its funding and pressure its management to get rid of troublesome journalists. And now we face the prospect of the disappearance of Australia’s longest, independent print masthead (Fairfax) as it is consumed by a television company (Nine) which is chaired by Peter Costello.

Display boards at the Australian Stock Exchange flash news of a falling market in Sydney, Friday, September 23, 2011.

AP Photo/Rick Rycroft

Analysis & Opinions - Australian Financial Review

How We Staved Off Recession and the GFC

| Sep. 13, 2018

In Australia we successfully navigated the GFC without losing a single financial institution – although we came perilously close in a number of cases – and without a single citizen losing their saving deposits. We also became the only major developed economy  to come through the great global recession unscathed.

Rupert Murdoch, center, Chairman and CEO of News Corporation, walks with his sons Lachian Murdoch, left, and James Murdoch, right, at the Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho on Tuesday, July 9, 2013.

AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Analysis & Opinions - Sydney Morning Herald

Cancer Eating the Heart of Australian Democracy

| Aug. 27, 2018

Beneath the sound and light show that passed for Australian politics last week, there is a much deeper question of what underlying forces have been at work that have brought us this low. The uncomfortable truth is, since the coup of June 2010, Australian politics has become vicious, toxic and unstable. The core question is why?

Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at the closing session of the annual National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Tuesday, March 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP Photo/Andy Wong

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

What the West Doesn’t Get About Xi Jinping

| Mar. 20, 2018

The recent decision by China’s National People’s Congress to abolish term limits for the office of the president has sent shock waves through the West: Xi Jinping, the current officeholder, is suddenly being described as a new Confucian autocrat, overseeing a state still governed by a Marxist-Leninist party, presiding over a selectively capitalist economy, with ambitions to make his country a global superpower.

Cpl. Edward Chin of the 3rd Battalion, 4th Marines Regiment, covers the face of a statue of Saddam Hussein with an American flag before toppling it in downtown in Baghdad on Wednesday, April 9, 2003. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)

AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File

Analysis & Opinions - Sydney Morning Herald

The Monstrous Strategic Mistake That Took Us to War in Iraq

| Mar. 20, 2018

John Howard’s decision to commit thousands of Australian troops to the invasion of Iraq 15 years ago ranks as one of the two great failures of Australian foreign policy since the Second World War.

The other is Menzies’ decision to send forces to Vietnam. Both cases represented an abysmal failure of Australian political leadership, driven by an unnecessary capitulation to strategically foolhardy decisions by the US administrations of the time.

Both decisions were taken without independent Australian analysis of the legitimacy of American war aims, the credibility of American military strategy to both win the war and secure the peace, as well as the long-term consequences for Australian national interests.

High school senior D'Angelo McDade, front right, leads a march in Chicago's North Lawndale neighborhood during a walkout to protest gun violence and show solidarity with survivors of the shooting in Parkland Fla., on Wednesday, March 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Martha Irvine)

AP Photo/Martha Irvine

Analysis & Opinions - Education Week

Parkland Shooting: What Can We Learn from Abroad?

    Author:
  • Heather Singmaster
| Mar. 19, 2018

If you are looking for students who exemplify the "take-action" aspect of global competence, look no further than the survivors of the Parkland shooting. Not only have they been acting locally and nationally, they recently took their message to the world at the Dubai Global Education and Skills Forum. One of the survivors, Sam Zeif, has brought up the example of Australia as one that the U.S. should look to as an example. To learn more, I interviewed The Honorable Kevin Rudd, 26th Prime Minister of Australia and President of the Asia Society Policy Institute, New York.