32 Items

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He about trade relations between their two countries, February 22, 2019.

Susan Walsh (AP)

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Even a Deal on Trade Won’t Paper Over the Widening Gap Between Washington and Beijing

| Apr. 24, 2019

The uncomfortable truth is that the United States and China countries face a deepeningdivergence of values and interests. The economic and military gap between them is narrowing, and both recognize that their mastery of high technologies of the future (of which artificial intelligence is but one) will ultimately determine their future claims to dominant superpower status. Given these realities, it is difficult to imagine a new bilateral relationship that will be based on policy principles substantive enough to prevent the two countries from gradually sliding in the direction of crisis, conflict or even war.

Flag bearers carrying the flags of the Commonwealth through Westminster Abbey

AP Photo/Richard Pohle

Analysis & Opinions - The Guardian

Think the Commonwealth Can Save Brexit Britain? That’s Utter Delusion

| Mar. 11, 2019

If Britain proceeds with giving effect to what future historians will legitimately describe as the longest suicide note in history by leaving the union, the cold, hard reality is that the mathematics simply don’t stack up in terms of credible economic alternatives to Europe. Much as any Australian, Canadian and New Zealand governments of whichever persuasion would do whatever they could to frame new free-trade agreements with the UK, the bottom line is that 65 million of us do not come within a bull’s roar of Britain's adjacent market of 450 million Europeans. 

The American flag flies alongside a Chinese national symbol as President Donald Trump is welcomed to a summit in Beijing, November 9, 2017.

Andy Wong (AP)

Speech - Asia Society Policy Institute

The Avoidable War: Reflections on U.S.-China Relations and the End of Strategic Engagement

| January 2019

The Asia Policy Institute recently released a collection of speeches by its President and former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd about the rivalry between China and the United States. In his forward to the collection, Graham Allison explains why relations between the two countries have become "the defining issue of international relations in the 21st century", and why Kevin Rudd is uniquely equipped to provide insight into them. Read on for both the full introduction and the full report.

"Within the covers of this book, long-time China watcher and former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has provided an analytic snapshot that would normally only be available to the president or prime minister of a major nation. In substance, it would be the envy of the best professional intelligence agency."

Rupert Murdoch attends the WSJ Magazine 2017 Innovator Awards at The Museum of Modern Art on Wednesday on November 1, 2017, in New York.

Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Analysis & Opinions - Sydney Morning Herald

'Culture of Fear': Murdoch, the ABC and How to Fix a Media in Crisis

| Oct. 02, 2018

So what should be done about the rolling crises washing over what remains of the Australian media? Rupert Murdoch has been up to his neck in the elevation and removal of Australian prime ministers for the better part of a decade. The ABC has seen the conservatives politicise its board, demolish its funding and pressure its management to get rid of troublesome journalists. And now we face the prospect of the disappearance of Australia’s longest, independent print masthead (Fairfax) as it is consumed by a television company (Nine) which is chaired by Peter Costello.

Display boards at the Australian Stock Exchange flash news of a falling market in Sydney, Friday, September 23, 2011.

AP Photo/Rick Rycroft

Analysis & Opinions - Australian Financial Review

How We Staved Off Recession and the GFC

| Sep. 13, 2018

In Australia we successfully navigated the GFC without losing a single financial institution – although we came perilously close in a number of cases – and without a single citizen losing their saving deposits. We also became the only major developed economy  to come through the great global recession unscathed.

Rupert Murdoch, center, Chairman and CEO of News Corporation, walks with his sons Lachian Murdoch, left, and James Murdoch, right, at the Allen & Company Sun Valley Conference in Sun Valley, Idaho on Tuesday, July 9, 2013.

AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

Analysis & Opinions - Sydney Morning Herald

Cancer Eating the Heart of Australian Democracy

| Aug. 27, 2018

Beneath the sound and light show that passed for Australian politics last week, there is a much deeper question of what underlying forces have been at work that have brought us this low. The uncomfortable truth is, since the coup of June 2010, Australian politics has become vicious, toxic and unstable. The core question is why?

Chinese President Xi Jinping delivers a speech at the closing session of the annual National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Tuesday, March 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

AP Photo/Andy Wong

Analysis & Opinions - The New York Times

What the West Doesn’t Get About Xi Jinping

| Mar. 20, 2018

The recent decision by China’s National People’s Congress to abolish term limits for the office of the president has sent shock waves through the West: Xi Jinping, the current officeholder, is suddenly being described as a new Confucian autocrat, overseeing a state still governed by a Marxist-Leninist party, presiding over a selectively capitalist economy, with ambitions to make his country a global superpower.