2 Items

U.S. President Barack Obama, left, and Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, shake hands following the conclusion of their joint news conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014.

(AP Photo)

Analysis & Opinions - Financial Times

Xi and Obama have shown leadership on emissions

| November 13, 2014

In the cynical world of politics it is important, just occasionally, to give credit where it is due. The commitments on carbon emissions announced on Wednesday by President Barack Obama of the US and President Xi Jinping of China, supported by the significant diplomacy of Secretary of State John Kerry, are both environmentally substantive and politically influential. Between them, these countries account for 44 per cent of global carbon emissions – a share that is still rising.

Chinese women walk past a luxury fashion boutique at a shopping mall in Beijing, China Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. China's economic growth waned to a five-year low of 7.3 percent last quarter.

(AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Analysis & Opinions - CNBC

Challenges China faces for its future

| October 16, 2014

China's political, economic and foreign policy over the next decade is not only fundamental to the country itself, but also to the wider Asia-Pacific region and – increasingly -- the world beyond.

China already represents 16 percent of global gross domestic product (GDP), rising to 28 percent by 2030. China is also by far the world's largest emitter of greenhouse gases. Furthermore, continued maritime boundary disputes in both the East and South China seas are a significant continuing factor in the region's underlining strategic instability. How China deals with each of these challenges is therefore of significance to us all.