9 Items

Russian President Vladimir Putin, left, and China's President Xi Jinping shake hands prior to their talks on the sideline of the 11th edition of the BRICS Summit, in Brasilia, Brazil, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019.

Ramil Sitdikov, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - Barron's

Russia and China Are Hard Targets for U.S. Sanctions. That Could Be a Problem.

| Feb. 29, 2020

When wielded effectively, U.S. sanctions have weakened targets like Iran and North Korea without impacting the global economy. But against authoritarian heavyweights like Russia and China, this may no longer be the case. America’s policy options are narrowing.

President Donald Trump, left, poses for a photo with Chinese President Xi Jinping.

AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

A Financial Statecraft Strategy for the United States to Address the Rise of China

| July 01, 2019

Washington should adjust its coercive economic strategy to reflect a broader use of tools beyond sanctions. Given the degree of political interference in China’s banking system via formal state ownership and the indirect influence of opaque party committees, penalties imposed against the country’s banks are unlikely to produce a meaningful change in behavior.

Photo of people crossing bridge in Shanghai that shows stock prices.

(AP Photo/Paul Traynor)

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

From Silicon Valley to Shenzhen: Dollar Exposures in Chinese Fintech

| Dec. 17, 2018

In the post-9/11 era, Washington has waged innovative campaigns against terrorism finance, sanctions evasion, and money laundering. Leveraging America’s heavyweight status in the international financial system, the United States Treasury has isolated and bankrupted rogue regimes, global terrorists, and their enablers. As financial technology transforms global business, the traditional financial system faces new competition across a suite of offerings, ranging from brokerage services to peer to peer lending. In no area is this clearer than in mobile payments, where a global hegemon lies ready to exercise its weight, and it is not the United States. 

President Donald Trump talks with Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, at a summit of heads of state and government at NATO headquarters in Brussels on Wednesday, July 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Analysis & Opinions - Atlantic Council

Trump Extends Feud with Turkey: Now What?

    Author:
  • David Wemer
| Aug. 10, 2018

On August 8, US President Donald J. Trump announced the doubling of steel and aluminum tariffs on Turkey, escalating the tension between the two NATO countries that has reached a boiling point over the last several weeks.

What does this escalation mean for US-Turkey relations and what should Washington and Ankara do from here? Atlantic Council experts and staff provide their reactions.