6 Events

A nighttime view of the Lujiazui peninsula of Shanghai, seen from the Bund, 25 November 2019. Lujiazui is Shanghai’s financial district.

Wikimedia CC/Phizz

Seminar - Open to the Public

When Fast-Growing Great Powers Slow Down: Historical Evidence and Implications for China

Thu., Sep. 24, 2020 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Online

Speaker: Michael Beckley, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Tufts University

Most discussion on U.S.-China policy focuses on the implications of a rising China. This presentation, by contrast, considers some of the challenges that could be posed by an economically stagnating China. How would a severe and sustained economic growth slowdown affect China's foreign policy and military modernization? Would military conflict between China and the United States become more or less likely? This presentation addresses these questions by comparing China to past rising great powers that experienced major economic slowdowns.

Everyone is welcome to join us online via Zoom! Please register in advance for this seminar:
https://harvard.zoom.us/j/96550562494?pwd=REx3b1RWaVYxZWdhVW5Hbk9Ra3JEQT09

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Unipolar Era: Why America's Edge Will Endure

Thu., Nov. 16, 2017 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Michael Beckley, Research Fellow, International Security Program

The United States has been the world's dominant power for more than a century. Now many analysts believe other countries are rising. Is the United States doomed to decline? Is the unipolar era over? In this seminar, Michael Beckley argues that the United States has unique advantages over other nations that, if used wisely, will allow it to remain the world's sole superpower throughout this century.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Containing China: How the Geopolitics of Asia Check China's Rise

Thu., Sep. 22, 2016 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

Many analysts argue that China will soon dominate East Asia militarily. In reality, however, China is far from achieving this goal and will remain so for the foreseeable future. Homeland security missions drain China's military resources; China's neighbors have acquired capabilities that preclude Chinese sea and air control throughout most of the East and South China Seas; and China's economy has stagnated and wracked up liabilities that will limit the growth of China's military budget.  This seminar describes these developments and discusses their implications for U.S. foreign policy.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

National Power: Measuring What Matters

Thu., Oct. 15, 2015 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

National power is the most important variable in international relations, yet scholars still lack a reliable method for measuring it. This seminar addresses this problem by developing and testing two schools of thought about how to measure national power.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Entangling Alliances? Assessing the Security Risks of America's Defense Pacts

Thu., Oct. 3, 2013 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

A large literature on U.S. foreign policy takes for granted that America's alliances entangle the United States into military conflicts that it might otherwise avoid.  Yet proponents of this argument have presented very little evidence that this entanglement mechanism has actually played a significant role in U.S. foreign policy. The speaker looks for such evidence in all post-1945 U.S. military conflicts and finds hardly any.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Unipolar Era: Why American Power Persists and China's Rise Is Limited

Thu., Oct. 27, 2011 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

Will China overtake the United States as the world's number one power? Most analysts believe the United States is doomed to decline because of globalization—the integration of national economies and the diffusion of technology from developed to developing countries—and the hegemonic burdens the United States bears to support globalization. This study challenges the conventional wisdom by showing that America's dominant position is durable and that globalization and hegemony are the main reasons why.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.