6 Events

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Israeli Justice Minister Tzipi Livni and Palestinian chief negotiator Saeb Erekat at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2013.

State Dept. Photo

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Logic of Using Symbolic Reparations in Conflict Negotiation: Insights from Israel/Palestine

Thu., Oct. 24, 2013 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

To illustrate the potential effects of symbolic strategies, the seminar considers the application of symbolic reparations to the "historical" case of the 1948 Palestinian refugees in the context of Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations. The empirical analysis draws on previous rounds of official negotiations, on track-two workshops and initiatives, and on civil-society projects.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Friend in the Closet? Material Interests and Ideology in India-Israel Relations

Thu., May 23, 2013 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

This seminar will provide an overview of India-Israel relations and will argue that there is a gap between India's material interests and its ideological positions and that this gap might be detrimental to the future of India-Israel bilateral relations.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Beyond Kumbaya: Using Symbolic Reparations in the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Thu., Oct. 13, 2011 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

The common perception is that transitional justice and specifically symbolic reparations are concerned with notions of reconciliation and forgiveness and therefore with post-conflict peace-building processes and not with on-going conflicts. Dr. Ben-Josef Hirsch will argue not only that transitional justice is a viable framework for the Israeli-Palestinian context but also that the use of symbolic reparations may have the potential for breaking the long-standing deadlock in the negotiations.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Christians in support of Israel march in Jerusalem, Apr. 7, 2008. U.S. Evangelist John Hagee, a Christian Zionist, brought hundreds of backers on a solidarity trip to Israel.

AP Photo

Seminar - Open to the Public

Until the Messiah Do Us Part? Israel, American Christian Zionism, and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

Thu., Jan. 28, 2010 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

This seminar asks what, if any, has been the impact of the ideological and political alliance between American Christian Zionists and the Israeli Right in the context of negotiating an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Moyamba, Sierra Leone, 2003

Photograph courtesy of Rosalind Shaw

Seminar - Open to the Public

Measuring Truth and Reconciliation? Lessons from Sierra Leone

Thu., May 14, 2009 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

Over the last decade, truth and reconciliation commissions have been initiated in many countries emerging out of conflicts. A broad consensus has developed that truth-seeking not only contributes to reconciliation, but also alleviates victims' suffering, promotes trust, contributes to the consolidation of democracy, and helps  prevent future conflict. In spite of the development of truth and reconciliation commissions as an international norm, empirically assessing these assumed benign effects has been challenging. In this seminar, the speakers introduce a community-level survey methodology for assessing the impact of truth and reconciliation commissions. They develop and present the initial application of this methodology to the case of the truth and reconciliation commission in Sierra Leone (2000).

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.