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In this photo provided by Tasnim News Agency, a demonstrator waves a huge Iranian flag during a pro-government rally in the northeastern city of Mashhad, Iran, on Jan. 4, 2018 (Nima Najafzadeh/Tasnim News Agency via AP).

Nima Najafzadeh/Tasnim News Agency via AP

Analysis & Opinions - USA Today

Now is the Time to Hit the Iranian Regime With Lower Oil Prices

| Jan. 07, 2018

Mass protests are gripping Iran as its people express their discontent with crippling poverty, governmental corruption, and Tehran's highly expensive sponsorship of terrorist proxies around the Middle East. The protests are geographically widespread, rural and urban, and challenge the very sinews of Iran's mullahcracy. The United States can and should support Iranian freedom by pressuring the regime at its most vulnerable point, oil revenues. This strategy should have long- and short-term components, both designed to decrease global oil prices. 

A black-and-white depiction of Qatar's emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, attracts signatures and comments of support from residents amid a diplomatic crisis between Qatar and neighboring Arab countries in Doha, Qatar, on July 3, 2017 (AP Photo/Maggie Hyde).

AP Photo/Maggie Hyde

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Qatar is at the Center of Today's Arab Tangle

| Nov. 15, 2017

A speedy but proper resolution of the standoff with Qatar is clearly in American interests. Consistent with President Trump’s May 20 Riyadh speech, and his just-announced plan of action against Iran, such a resolution must include Doha’s cessation of all forms of support for extremist Islamic movements and the end of its flirtation with Tehran.

President Donald Trump shakes hands with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas after making statements to the press in the West Bank City of Bethlehem on May 23, 2017 (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File).

AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Art of the Peace Deal: What Can Be Done in Israel and Palestine?

| Oct. 29, 2017

A series of circumstances currently present Israelis and Palestinians with a unique opportunity to resolve their historic conflict. The first of these was the election of President Donald Trump, who seems genuinely motivated by the challenge of succeeding where all his predecessors have failed: to bring peace to Israel-Palestine. Indeed, the president’s many naysayers, veterans of all previous failed efforts to resolve the conflict, seem to only increase Trump’s motivation to attempt the impossible. “We’re working very hard on it,” he recently said in New York, “Historically, people say it can’t happen. I say it can happen.”

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson escorts Qatar's Foreign Minister Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdulrahman Al Thani to the Treaty Room of the State Department in Washington, Wednesday, July 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

Qatar Is Playing a Dangerous Game of Political Chicken

| Aug. 06, 2017

Last month a Saudi-led group of nations that includes Egypt, UAE and Bahrain modified the thirteen demands it had made on Qatar over a month ago and instead insisted on six principles. These principles are an attempt to convince the Qataris to combat extremism and terror, to prevent the expression of incitement to violence, to stop interfering in the internal affairs of other states, and to refrain from supporting illegal entities, among other things. And while moving from making demands to urging an acceptance of principles is being spoken of as a reconciliatory gesture on the part of the anti-Qatar bloc, the central contentious issue remains: Qatar’s support for the Muslim Brotherhood. The Saudi coalition knows what the experiences of numerous Muslim governments have long proven: the Muslim Brotherhood is an oppositionist movement that does not represent a sustainable form of governance, offers little in the way of social or economic programs, and some of its members have been linked to political violence and jihadist terror.

In this Tuesday, July 15, 2014 file photo, Jordanian children chant anti-Israel slogans during a Muslim Brotherhood Islamic movement protest in front of the Israeli embassy in Amman, Jordan. A diplomatic standoff between Qatar and a quartet of Arab nations accusing it of sponsoring terrorism has thrust a spotlight on an opaque network of charities and prominent figures freely operating in Qatar. (AP Photo, File)

AP Photo, File

Analysis & Opinions - The Telegraph

The Saudi Coalition Is Right. Qatar's Support for the Muslim Brotherhood Must Not Stand

| July 19, 2017

The Saudi coalition knows what the experiences of numerous Muslim governments have long proven: the Muslim Brotherhood is an oppositionist movement that does not represent a sustainable form of governance, offers little in the way of  social or economic programmes, and some of its members have been linked to political violence and jihadist terror.

A man wears a Guy Fawkes mask and carries his daughter during a celebration by the Muslim Brotherhood movement to declare victory of Gaza and Hamas against Israel, in Amman, Jordan, Friday, Aug. 29, 2014. (AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon)

AP Photo/Mohammad Hannon

Paper - Intelligence Project

The Muslim Brotherhood: A Failure in Political Evolution

| July 2017

While the Muslim Brotherhood (MB) started as a movement centered on resistance to what it saw as the Westernization, or de-Islamization, of Muslim culture, it soon realized that resistance was only as effective as its access to power. Thus began the group’s long attempt to infiltrate the halls of governance. As this report will show, these attempts have failed. In essence, the tree of the Muslim Brotherhood has been unable to flower into a viable governmental structure for the Arab world because it is still fed by its oppositionist roots.

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Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

President Trump Goes to Saudi Arabia

| May 19, 2017

President Trump announced on May 4 that his first foreign trip would be to the centers of the three major world religions: Saudi Arabia, Israel, and the Vatican. The inclusion of the Saudi kingdom in this list indicates how seriously the president takes the crises gripping the Arab and Muslim worlds. But more importantly, his schedule during his visit shows he plans to break with the patterns of the Obama administration and, rather than trying to enforce Western policies and methods from above, work with the region’s countries and institutions in a collaborative fashion so that the US can once again play an effective and sustained role in the Middle East.