26 Items

U.S. Steel Granite City Works facility

AP Photo/Jeff Roberson

Report - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The Future of Green Hydrogen Value Chains: Geopolitical and Market Implications in the Industrial Sector

| Oct. 05, 2022

This report studies the role countries could play in future green hydrogen industrial markets, focusing on three key applications: ammonia, methanol, and steel production. To elucidate the impact of the transition to a low-carbon economy on energy value chains, Eicke and De Blasio propose an analytical framework to cluster countries into five groups based on the variables of resource endowment, existing industrial production, and economic relatedness.

pipes

LoggaWiggler/Pixabay

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

MIGHTY: Model of International Green Hydrogen Trade

| Aug. 03, 2022

The Model of International Green Hydrogen Trade (MIGHTY) is an optimization model to investigate renewable hydrogen production, consumption, and trade between countries. MIGHTY supports strategic analysis by policymakers and investors about the potential roles that countries and regions will play in future renewable hydrogen markets. This paper introduces the model and describes the model formulation.

close up of gray metal chain

Aida L/Unsplash

Policy Brief - Italian Institute for International Political Studies

Technological Innovation and the Energy Value Chains in the Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy

| July 28, 2022

Recent events have highlighted how wars, pandemics, and even supply chain issues can quickly blunt existing efforts and policies to address climate change. The solution cannot lie in globalization, argue authors De Blasio and Zheng, but instead in a long-term systemic focus on clean technology innovation. The path ahead will require a collective understanding of how developing and deploying the needed clean technology innovation will affect value chains, markets, and geopolitics.

Swirling light trails

Federico Beccari/Unsplash

Policy Brief - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Technological Innovation and the Future of Energy Value Chains

| Apr. 08, 2022

The transition from energy systems dominated by fossil fuels to ones based on renewable electricity and carbon-free molecules will significantly impact existing value chains and forge new pathways and transformation steps from production to consumption. This transition will bring not only substantial cost challenges but also promises to dramatically alter stakeholders’ interactions along value chains.

Flag of the European Union against a blue sky

Christian Lue/Unsplash

Report - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The Future of Renewable Hydrogen in the European Union: Market and Geopolitical Implications

This paper focuses on the market and geopolitical implications of renewable hydrogen adoption at scale in the European Union (EU). The authors analyze long-term strategies based on three reference scenarios in which the EU prioritizes a different strategic variable: energy independence, cost (optimization), or energy security. Developing competitive and secure hydrogen markets will require close coordination between policy, technology, capital, and society—and for EU countries to unite behind a shared long-term vision.

Photo of a car with Hydrogen Fuel written on the side.

Photo by David Zalubowski/AP

Policy Brief

The European Union at a Crossroads: Unlocking Renewable Hydrogen’s Potential

| November 2021

The European Union (EU) is highly competitive in clean technologies manufacturing and thus well-positioned to benefit from the emergence of global hydrogen markets. But a narrow focus on short-term cost considerations could drive member states to implement national roadmaps with little or no coordination among themselves and hence little or no chance of competing globally.

Policy Brief

The Role of Blockchain in Green Hydrogen Value Chains

| November 2021

As energy systems increasingly evolve from centralized to decentralized, from “grey” to “green,” stakeholders will need to efficiently account for and track emissions and green molecules in a transparent, secure, and standardized way, and must be able to do so along value chains from production to consumption.

A car parked next to a hydrogen fuel pump in Japan with the text "hydrogen 35" vertically on the side.

Shizuo Kambayashi/AP

Report - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Mission Hydrogen: Accelerating the Transition to a Low Carbon Economy

| Oct. 29, 2021

To accelerate the global transition to a low-carbon economy, all energy systems must be actively decarbonized. While hydrogen has been a staple in the energy and chemical industries for decades, clean hydrogen – defined as hydrogen produced from water electrolysis with zero-carbon electricity – has captured increasing political and business momentum as a versatile and sustainable energy carrier in the future carbon-free energy puzzle.

A sign indicates a hydrogen fuel option at a newly opened refueling station in Munich, Monday, March 26, 2007.

AP Photo/Diether Endlicher

Policy Brief

Hydrogen Deployment at Scale: The Infrastructure Challenge

Clean hydrogen is experiencing unprecedented momentum as confidence in its ability to accelerate decarbonization efforts across multiple sectors is rising. New projects are announced almost every week. For example, an international developer, Intercontinental Energy, plans to build a plant in Oman that will produce almost 2 million tons of clean hydrogen and 10 million tons of clean ammonia. Dozens of other large-scale projects and several hundred smaller ones are already in the planning stage. Similarly, on the demand side, hydrogen is gaining support from customers. Prominent off-takers such as oil majors like Shell and bp, steelmakers like ThyssenKrupp, and world-leading ammonia producers like Yara are working on making a clean hydrogen economy a reality.

A tanker truck delivers liquid hydrogen to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, September 1997.

U.S. Dept. of Energy

Paper

The Role of Clean Hydrogen for a Sustainable Mobility

| August 2021

This paper analyzes clean hydrogen’s potential for driving emissions reductions in the mobility sector, focusing on road transportation, shipping, rail, and aviation. Overall, transportation is the second-largest producer of global CO2 emissions, after electricity and heat generation, and one of the hardest sectors to decarbonize due to its distributed nature and the advantages provided by fossil fuels in terms of high energy densities, ease of transportation and storage.