2 Events

Demobilized rebels wait in line as they surrend their weapons at a military base in Tumaco, Colombia, Apr. 3, 2009. Some 11 rebels of the National Liberation Army, ELN, Colombia's second largest rebel group, surrendered to the army.

AP Photo

Seminar - Open to the Public

Bankruptcy, Guns, or Campaigns: Explaining Armed Organizations' Post-War Trajectories

Thu., Oct. 1, 2009 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

What happens to armed organizations after they sign peace accords? Why do they dissolve, return to war, or form non-violent political parties? This seminar addresses and seeks to explain this empirical variation in former armed groups' trajectories, using extensive micro-level data on the Colombian paramilitaries.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Colombia's Peace Commissioner Luis Carlos Restrepo (L) receives a rifle from a  United Self-Defense Forces paramilitary fighter in northern Colombia, July 14, 2005, as part of an ongoing disarmament process.

AP Photo

Seminar - Open to the Public

Guns, Politics, or Bankruptcy: Disentangling the Determinants of Armed Organizations' Post-War Trajectories

Thu., Feb. 26, 2009 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

During post-war transitions, some armed groups retain an organizational structure capable of collective action while others disintegrate. Some remilitarize while other remain at peace. Variation in influence over non-combatants also varies dramatically; some ex-rebel and paramilitary structures form successful political parties while others retain little influence over the civilian population. This seminar addresses and seeks to explain this empirical variation in former armed groups’ trajectories, using micro-level data on the Colombian conflict.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come-first served basis.