169 Items

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks to the media after the G20 summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina on December 1, 2018.

Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

Putin’s Remarks on Use of Nuclear Weapons Are Confusing, But Unlikely to Constitute a Shift in Nuclear Posture

| Nov. 28, 2018

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s eschatological talk of nuclear Armageddon at this year’s Valdai forum has stirred up heated debates on how well his description of Russia’s potential use of nuclear weapons matches the country’s official military doctrine. However, a close look at Putin’s Oct. 18 remarks and Russia’s 2014 military doctrine reveals that, while Putin deviated from the language in the doctrine, he did not lie on the first use issue. Nor did he seem to be hinting at a shift in Russia’s nuclear posture. More likely, he was signaling to Washington that the existing nuclear arms control treaties need to remain in place for the sake of ensuring strategic stability in the U.S.-Russian nuclear dyad and avoiding an accidental war between the two countries.

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- US-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: June - November 2018

| Nov. 21, 2018
  • Graham Allison on likelihood of another 9/11 and need to deny terrorists nuclear weapons.
  • Bunn and Roth on regaining nuclear security momentum.
  • New books on lessons of U.S.-Russian non-proliferation cooperation and on preventing illicit nuclear trade.
  • Study: Congress needs to play a more active role in nuclear security.

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a news conference following a summit on Syria, in Istanbul on October 27, 2018.

AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis

Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

When Does Vladimir Putin’s Russia Send In Troops?

| Aug. 07, 2018

This month marks the tenth anniversary of Vladimir Putin’s first military intervention abroad, in Georgia. Since then there have been two more, continuing to this day, in Ukraine and Syria in 2014 and 2015, respectively. And still it’s worth asking: When does Putin authorize the use of military force, overtly or covertly, against other countries and why?

Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures while speaking during his news conference after the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) Summit in Qingdao in eastern China's Shandong Province,  June 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Is Vladimir Putin’s Russia in Decline? We Figured Out How to Measure ‘National Power.’

| June 20, 2018

Where does Russia stand as Vladimir Putin embarks on another six-year term as president? Analysts have been trying to figure out whether Russia has been rising, declining or stagnating since Putin ascended to power in 1999.

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- US-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: March - May 2018

  • U.S. and Russian experts ponder denuclearization of Korean Peninsula.
  • Graham Allison on changing the odds of nuclear terrorism.
  • William Tobey on insights on UNSCR 1540.
  • Siegfried Hecker calls for revival of U.S.-Russian nuclear cooperation.

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Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

Measuring National Power: Is Vladimir Putin’s Russia in Decline?

| May 04, 2018

As Vladimir Putin embarks on another six-year term as Russia’s president, Western pundits and policymakers are left wondering whether his reelection means that Moscow’s muscular policies toward America and other Western powers will continue or even escalate. But what is the reality of Russian power in the Putin era? Is Russia a rising, declining or stagnating power? How does its standing in the global order compare to other nations, including the United States, China and European powers?

Opposition demonstrators gather in the Republic Square celebrating Armenian Prime Minister's Serzh Sargsyan's resignation in Yerevan, Armenia, Monday, April 23, 2018. (Davit Abrahamyan/PAN Photo via AP)

Davit Abrahamyan/PAN Photo via AP

Analysis & Opinions - Russia Matters

Armenia: Why Has Vladimir Putin Not Intervened So Far and Will He?

| Apr. 24, 2018

The resignation of Armenia’s Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan after more than a week of mass protests in Russia’s backyard begs the question: Why has Moscow not intervened so far? The fist-pumping demonstrators bring to mind “color revolutions” in the post-Soviet neighborhood that the Kremlin seems to abhor, like the ones in Georgia and Ukraine. But even genuine color revolutions (which Armenia has not yet seen—more on that below) are not enough by themselves to prompt Russia to stage either a covert or overt intervention. As I have argued before, for Moscow to intervene in one of its Soviet-era satellites at least two conditions need to be present: First, Vladimir Putin has to see an acute threat to Russia’s vital national interests, such as the potential expansion of antagonistic Western-led alliances too close to Russia’s borders; second, the chances for defending or advancing its interests through the use of force have to be relatively high.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during a live televised speech in Moscow. March 23, 2018 (Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via Associated Press). Keywords: Putin, Russia,

Mikhail Klimentyev, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

From Mutually Assured Destruction to Mutually Assured Delusion (and Back?)

| Mar. 12, 2018

If U.S. and Russian decision-makers do not just profess but also genuinely believe in the continuing decline and pending collapse of each other’s countries, then chances are they will act more assertively against each other.

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- US-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism

The U.S.-Russia Initiative to Prevent Nuclear Terrorism Newsletter: December 2017 - February 2018

  • U.S. experts debate whether russia can be a viable CT partner for America.
  • Graham Allison on importance of prevention of nuclear terrorism.
  • Russia’s National Guard is mulling drone defense at NPP.
  • U.S. Nuclear Posture Review on countering nuclear terrorism.