2 Items

U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Michael Lyons, Joint Tactical Communications Office communications operator, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, looks through information on a workstation inside the Combined Air and Space Operations Center-Nellis during Red Flag 14-1 Feb. 5, 2014, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev.

U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Brett Clashman

Paper - Hoover Institution Press

Strengths Become Vulnerabilities: How a Digital World Disadvantages the United States in its International Relations

    Authors:
  • Jack L. Goldsmith
  • Stuart Russell
| June 05, 2018

This essay seeks to explain why the United States is struggling to deal with the “soft” cyberoperations that have been so prevalent in recent years: cyberespionage and cybertheft, often followed by strategic publication; information operations and propaganda; and relatively low-level cyber disruptions such as denial-of-service and ransomware attacks.

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Analysis & Opinions - Lawfare

Evaluating the U.K.'s ‘Active Cyber Defence’ Program

| Feb. 14, 2018

In November 2016, the U.K. government launched its Active Cyber Defence (ACD) program with the intention of tackling “in a relatively automated [and transparent] way, a significant proportion of the cyber attacks that hit the U.K.” True to their word, a little over a year on, last week the U.K.’s National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) published a full and frank account (over 60 pages long) of their progress to date. The report itself is full of technical implementation details. But it’s useful to cut through the specifics to explain exactly what ACD is and highlight its successes—how the program could benefit the United States as well.