7 Events

Seminar - Open to the Public

Asia-Pacific Nuclear Governance: Feeble, Fragmented but Fixable?

Wed., Mar. 29, 2017 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

Nuclear governance at the regional level in Asia-Pacific is alarmingly fragmented and feeble. An array of disparate, small bodies with varying memberships seek to address safety, security, nonproliferation, and disarmament, but without adding much to the global arrangements. Dr. Findlay will examine the future likely trajectory of nuclear energy in the region, the regional drivers of and constraints on strengthened regional governance, and the likelihood of a comprehensive, integrated nuclear governance regime emerging.

What Price Nuclear Governance? Funding the International Atomic Energy Agency

Greg Webb, IAEA

Seminar - Open to the Public

What Price Nuclear Governance? Funding the International Atomic Energy Agency

Thu., Mar. 24, 2016 | 2:30pm - 4:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

In this MTA seminar, Trevor Findlay will present the findings of a two-year MTA study, funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York, of how the IAEA is funded and how it might be funded in the future. His report considers critical questions facing the IAEA’s budget and finance: whether funding is sufficient for the Agency to carry out its core functions; whether increasing reliance on voluntary funding is appropriate; whether the budgetary process is as effective as it might be; whether the current funding system is equitable and appropriate; whether the Gordian knot between technical cooperation and nuclear safeguards and security can and should be broken through a grand budgetary bargain; and whether alternative funding sources besides member states can be tapped.

Safeguards inspectors

IAEA

Seminar - Open to the Public

The IAEA's Nuclear Safeguards Culture: What is it and Does it Matter?

Wed., Oct. 1, 2014 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Fainsod Room, Littauer-324

The presentation will employ organizational culture theory to dissect the nuclear safeguards culture of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The origins and evolution of the culture since the IAEA's founding in 1957 will be examined, including the extent to which it reflects the organizational culture of the Agency as a whole and that of the United Nations. Differences between safeguards culture and safety and security cultures will be explored. A key question is the extent to which the Agency's safeguards culture has changed since the strengthening of nuclear safeguards following the discovery of Iraq's illicit nuclear weapons program in the early 1990s. The presentation will conclude with findings about the current state of the culture, the discontinuities it faces and what the IAEA might do about it.

Seminar - Open to the Public

Disarming Syria: The Chemical Weapons Challenge

Thu., Nov. 21, 2013 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons and the United Nations are undertaking an unprecedented operation in Syria: disarming a country of a particular type of weaponry in the midst of a civil war. Professor Findlay will discuss the issue in the context of the overlapping legal, institutional, technical, and political demands being made of Syria and the prospects for success of the operation.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Seminar - Open to the Public

The Evolution of the IAEA: Using Nuclear Crises as Windows of Opportunity (or Not)

Wed., Mar. 13, 2013 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

This seminar will consider how the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has reacted to nuclear crises. The IAEA often appears not just to have weathered such crises, but to have successfully leaped through windows of opportunity presented by them. This has resulted in periodic expansions of its mandate, capabilities, and resources. The 2011 Fukushima disaster appears to be a puzzling exception, raising the question of what concatenation of factors needs to be present for the IAEA to take advantage of nuclear crises.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

May 27, 2011: IAEA fact-finding team members visit the emergency diesel generator at Reactor Unit 6 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in Okuma, Japan. The generator was the only one to survive the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

AP Photo/IAEA

Seminar - Open to the Public

The IAEA and Fukushima: Best Laid Plans, Reality Checks, and Doing It Better Next Time

Thu., Mar. 29, 2012 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Professor Findlay will analyze the response of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to the March 2011 nuclear reactor disaster at Fukushima, Japan. He will compare the expectations that the Agency, its member states, and other nuclear stakeholders had of the IAEA's role in such a situation with the harsh reality. Drawing on these insights, he will suggest possibilities for strengthening the Agency's capacities for handling the next Fukushima.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency, IAEA, Yukiya Amano of Japan delivers a speech at the beginning of the general conference of the IAEA, at the International Center in Vienna, Austria, Sept. 19, 2011.

AP Photo

Seminar - Open to the Public

Unleashing the Nuclear Watchdog: Strengthening and Reform of the International Atomic Energy Agency

Tue., Oct. 25, 2011 | 10:00am - 11:30am

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

Professor Trevor Findlay will present preliminary findings of his research on how the paramount global governance body in the nuclear field is fulfilling its mandate and how it might be strengthened and reformed.

Please join us! Coffee, tea, and decaf will be provided.