4 Upcoming Events

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

“Lessons in Crisis Management” A Conversation with Former Obama Ebola Czar Ron Klain

Wed., Feb. 28, 2018 | 12:00pm - 1:00pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Taubman Building, Room 401

The Homeland Security Project will host a conversation with Ron Klain, former Obama Ebola Czar and Chief of Staff to Vice Presidents Biden and Gore, to discuss his experience in crisis management as well as the current political climate.

Lunch will be served. Please RSVP here: https://goo.gl/forms/CVbc1hNIRsJuhr1B2

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Director Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Belfer Center Director's Lunch with Kendall Hoyt

Mon., Mar. 5, 2018 | 12:15pm - 1:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

The Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs will host a Director's Lunch with Kendall Hoyt, Assistant Professor, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth on “Building a Better Public Private Partnership for Biosecurity: Lessons from the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations,” in the Belfer Center Library (L369).

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Director Series - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Belfer Center Director's Lunch with Sebastian Abbot

Mon., Mar. 19, 2018 | 12:15pm - 1:30pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government - Littauer Building, Belfer Center Library, Room L369

The Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs host a Director's Lunch with Sebastian Abbot on his book “The Away Game:The Epic Search for Soccer's Next Superstars,” in the Belfer Center Library (L369). 

The gripping story of a group of boys discovered in what may be the largest talent search in sports history. Over the past decade, an audacious program called Football Dreams has held tryouts for millions of 13-year-old boys across Africa looking for soccer’s next superstars. Led by the Spanish scout who helped launch Lionel Messi’s career at Barcelona and funded by the desert kingdom of Qatar, the program has chosen a handful of boys each year to train to become professionals -- a process over a thousand times more selective than getting into Harvard.