111 Items

n this March 13, 2019, file photo, Instagram, Messenger and Facebook apps are are displayed on an iPhone in New York.

AP Photo/Jenny Kane, File

Analysis & Opinions - Negotiation Journal

Social Media Influence on Diplomatic Negotiation: Shifting the Shape of the Table

| Jan. 03, 2021

Social media is changing not only the atmosphere in which international negotiations take place; it is also changing the very substance of the deals. Because of the pace and proliferation of social media, negotiators must read “weak signals” early on—and anticipate a quickly organized, highly motivated opposition. However, diplomatic negotiators still lack the tools to engage in this sort of anticipatory strategy design. This article examines two recent cases, one involving the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and the other involving a German Constitutional Court’s ruling on the European Central Bank’s Public Debt Purchasing Program, in which social media had a highly disruptive, unanticipated impact on international negotiations—to the point of forcing negotiators’ hands—and suggests institutional remedies to better anticipate the catalytic impact of advancing technology on diplomatic interactions.

President Donald J. Trump joins G7 Leaders Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte; European Council President Donald Tusk; Japan Prime Minister Shinzo Abe; United Kingdom Prime Minister Boris Johnson; German Chancellor Angela Merkel; Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and G7 Summit host French President Emmanuel Macron during a G7 Working Session on Global Economy, Foreign Policy and Security Affairs at the Centre de Congrés Bellevue Sunday, Aug. 25, 2019, in Biarritz, France.

Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead/Flickr

Analysis & Opinions - MSNBC

At Post-G7 Presser, Trump Praises China's Xi, Says He is Open to Meeting with Iran Under Right Circumstances

| Aug. 26, 2019

After the G7 Summit, President Trump is now saying he would be open to a meeting with Iran if the circumstances were correct and they were "good players." He also claimed China wants a trade deal very badly and talks were "elevated" last night. Plus the president became salesman-in-chief when asked about next year's G7 summit - which he wants to host at his resort in Doral, Florida. NBC's Kelly O’Donnell, Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson, former Commerce Secretary and former U.S. ambassador to China Gary Locke, and former U.S. ambassador to NATO Nick Burns join Andrea Mitchell to discuss.

President Donald J. Trump participates in a bilateral meeting with the President of the Russian Federation Vladimir Putin during the G20 Japan Summit Friday, June 28, 2019, in Osaka, Japan. (Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead)

Official White House Photo by Shealah Craighead/Flickr

Analysis & Opinions - MSNBC

President Trump: Better to Have Russia Inside the Tent

| Aug. 26, 2019

President Trump is continuing to raise the issue of readmitting Russia to the G7, and is still blaming President Obama for throwing Moscow out of the group. Former U.S. ambassador to NATO and Washington Post foreign columnist David Ignatius join Andrea Mitchell to discuss.

Brexit

Pixabay

Analysis & Opinions - Time

What Next for Brexit: Britain Plays the Ultimate Game of ‘Deal or No Deal’

    Author:
  • Amanda Sloat
| Mar. 06, 2019

Brexit with a deal. Brexit without a deal. No Brexit. Those are the only possible destinations on the United Kingdom’s torturous journey toward determining its future relationship with the European Union. An extension, election, or second referendum would simply be a detour on the road toward one of those endpoints.

Reporters Jason and Yeganeh Rezaian Recount Ordeal in Iranian Prison

Harvard Staff Photographer

Newspaper Article - Harvard Gazette

A 'Prisoner' Story

    Author:
  • Christina Pazzanese
| Feb. 08, 2019

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian recounts his 544 days in an Iranian prison during a talk with R. Nicholas Burns of the Harvard Kennedy School.

 People walk past by an election poster of Turkey's president and ruling Justice and Development Party leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan, left, and Muharrem Ince, presidential candidate of the main opposition Republican People's Party, in Istanbul, Tuesday, June 19, 2018.

AP Photo/Emrah Gurel

Analysis & Opinions - Brookings Institution

Unfair play: Central government spending under Turkey’s AK Party

| June 20, 2018

On June 24, Turkey will go to early presidential and parliamentary polls. The snap elections come amidst significant macroeconomic turmoil. As fears persist over the strength of Turkey’s economy, what can be said about how the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) has managed public resources since its arrival into power in 2002? Do patterns of government spending reflect development or economic needs or do political priorities largely dictate how budgets are allocated?