391 Items

Great Seal of the United States

U.S. Embassy to Costa Rica

Presentation - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

The American Diplomacy Project: A U.S. Diplomatic Service for the 21st Century

On November 17, Ambassadors Nicholas Burns, Marc Grossman, and Marcie Ries officially launched their report, “A U.S. Diplomatic Service for the 21st Century,”published as part of the American Diplomacy Project at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard Kennedy School.  These distinguished career Foreign Service Officers, and report co-authors, shared their recommendations on how to rebuild, reform, and reimagine the U.S. Foreign Service so that America can have the strongest and most effective diplomatic service to defend our country and advance its interests. 

Report - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

A U.S. Diplomatic Service for the 21st Century

Many of the most serious challenges the United States will face in 2021 and beyond will require our diplomats to take the lead. These include the return of great power competition, leading a global response to the pandemic and its consequences, supporting American companies overseas during a devastating recession, mounting a major effort on climate change, negotiating an end to the Afghan and Iraq wars, and helping American citizens in every corner of the world who need the support of their government. Morale in the State Department, however, is at an all-time low and efforts to promote greater racial and ethnic diversity have failed just when the country needs women and men of all backgrounds as our primary link to nearly every country in the world. There are challenges to be met inside the Foreign Service, including an honest self-assessment of the Service’s internal culture.

Nicholas Burns

Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Analysis & Opinions - MSNBC

NYT reports Pres. Trump sought options for attacking Iran

| Nov. 17, 2020

Nick Burns, former U.S. Ambassador to NATO and Peter Baker join Andrea Mitchell to discuss the national security threats that accompany the stalled transition and the New York Times' new reporting on President Trump seeking military action against Iran's main nuclear site. "If we launched a military attack on any target in Iran, what we know about the Iranians is they do hit back," Amb. Burns says. "They could try to kidnap or kill American citizens anywhere in the world. They’ve done that in the past.”

America needs to invest more in diplomacy

Nick Lowndes

Analysis & Opinions - The Economist

America needs to invest more in diplomacy

| Nov. 17, 2020

WHO WILL run the world in 2021? International institutions such as the United Nations have been weakened by great-power rivalry. Russia will be a spoiler, not a leader. In Europe, Boris Johnson will have his hands full with the aftermath of Brexit, Germany’s Angela Merkel will leave the stage and France’s Emmanuel Macron has limited means to pursue his grand ideas. China is the rising superpower, and an increasingly assertive one, but not yet keen, let alone able, to take on the burdens of world leadership. The question is whether America, under President Joe Biden, will be prepared to step back into the role.

A supporter of President-elect Joe Biden (left) exchanges viewpoints with supporters of President Trump outside the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg on Nov. 7

JULIO CORTEZ/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

To rebuild, look abroad

| Nov. 16, 2020

The United States manages relationships with almost 200 nations and, even with a tiny number that are truly enemies, we have almost always found ways to keep engagement alive. With this engagement we position ourselves to be more secure, stable, and influential, through building bridges, finding mutual interests, and creating coalitions. So why can’t we apply the same approach to ourselves, when we have far more in common among 50 states than we do with 200 nations?

Joe Biden at EU Headquarters

CNN

Analysis & Opinions - CNN

Joe Biden's victory isn't enough on its own to heal the wounds Trump inflicted on Europe

| Nov. 14, 2020

Joe Biden's victory in the US presidential election was met with a sigh of relief across the vast majority of European capitals. In the eyes of most, Donald Trump's presidency saw the European Union's most important ally vacillate between uninterest and outright aggression. However, the prospect of an incoming administration willing to reengage with Brussels, as well as the circumstances in which Biden won, has also given the world's largest economic bloc cause for introspection.

Christopher Miller, pictured on Sept. 24, became acting defense secretary after President Trump fired Mark Esper. Miller is perceived as more loyal to Trump than Esper.

Joshua Roberts / Pool/Getty Images

Analysis & Opinions

Former National Security Officials Worry What Trump Could Do In Iran And Afghanistan

| Nov. 13, 2020

After a purge at the Pentagon, former national security officials are worried about the fallout if President Trump were to launch an unprovoked military action against Iran or make big changes in Afghanistan in his waning days in office.