26 Items

President Donald Trump waves as he boards Air Force One after a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019, in Hanoi.

(AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Reactions to Collapse of Trump-Kim Summit 2019

Feb. 28, 2019

Following the breakdown of  the Trump-Kim Summit in Hanoi, Belfer Center Korea experts Matthew Bunn, Nicholas Burns, Martin Malin, Joseph Nye, Gary Samore, Wendy Sherman, and Jon Wolfsthal react to the collapse of the talks and suggest steps the United States should take now.

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Ash Carter on U.S. Grand Strategy in Asia

| Fall/Winter 2018-2019

For more than two decades, I worked to strengthen military and diplomatic ties with China, alongside scores of other U.S. and allied officials, all of us sincere in our belief that China could be encouraged to join the principled, inclusive network that has served as the backbone of regional security since the end of World War II - and thus the Asian miracle. It is easy for me to imagine having used my time as Secretary of Defense to solidify those ties and bring China into closer partnership with the United States and the other participants in the network. 

WWI Centenary Commemorated at the Tower of London in 2014 with 888,246 ceramic poppies

Shawn Spencer-Smith/ Flickr

Analysis & Opinions - Atlantic Council

100 Years Later: Reflecting on the Lessons of World War I

| Nov. 11, 2018

"An abiding lesson for the United States is that we must remain committed to Europe—to our democratic allies in NATO as well as to our strategic partnership with the European Union," writes Professor Nicholas Burns, Faculty Chair of the Belfer Center's Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship, in his reflection on the 100 years since the end of the First World War on November 11, 1918.

The Republican Palace in Baghdad, Iraq, 22 Feb. 2010. The palace served as the headquarters of the U.S. occupation of Iraq, and the Green Zone developed around it.

Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Don't Knock Offshore Balancing Until You've Tried It

| December 8, 2016

"Offshore balancing has not failed in the Middle East because it hasn't been U.S. strategy for almost a generation. The United States did act like an offshore balancer from 1945 to about 1990: It had vital interests in the region and wanted to prevent any state (including the Soviet Union) from controlling the Gulf. But it pursued this goal first by relying on Great Britain (until 1967) and then by turning to local allies like the shah of Iran. After the shah fell in 1979, the United States created the Rapid Deployment Force (RDF) so it could affect the balance of power swiftly and directly and thus deter a possible Soviet foray into the Gulf. But it didn't park the RDF in the Gulf or elsewhere in the region; instead, it kept it offshore and over the horizon and didn't use it until Iraq seized Kuwait in August 1990."

In this photo provided by the Syrian Civil Defense group known as the White Helmets, taken Sept. 23, 2016, a destroyed ambulance is seen outside the Syrian Civil Defense main center after airstrikes in the rebel-held part of eastern Aleppo, Syria.

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

The Great Myth About U.S. Intervention in Syria

| October 24, 2016

"...[B]y far the worst argument for intervening in Syria is the suggestion that greater U.S. involvement is necessary to preserve U.S. credibility, to maintain its reputation as a distinctly moral great power, or to preserve the respect of allies and adversaries alike. The historical record shows that not intervening in humanitarian tragedies has had little impact on America's standing in the past, and the same is true today."

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Featured Fellows

Summer 2016

The heart of the Belfer Center is its resident research community of more than 150 scholars, including faculty, practitioners, senior fellows, and—each year—a new group of research fellows from around the world. Research fellows are selected from a large number of pre- and post-doctoral applicants by the Center’s major research programs. They work collaboratively with other Center researchers, as well as on their own projects, presenting and debating their findings through publications, seminars, and brainstorming sessions. These fellows go on to assume major leadership roles in academia, government, business, and other fields.

As summer approaches, we bid farewell and extend our appreciation to the following fellows who are moving on to new appointments.
A number of additional fellows are in the process of finalizing details on their next posts. We wish them all well!

- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Center Fellows Share Insights

Several fellows from different Belfer Center programs and projects described insights they’ve gained or lessons they’ve learned during their fellowships at the Center.

Street memorial to the November 2015 Paris attacks in Berlin, Germany, November 14, 2015.

Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

Don't Give ISIS What It Wants

| November 16, 2015

"...[S]tep one is not to fall into the obvious trap the Islamic State has set. If we buy into its vision of relentless cultural, religious, and civilizational conflict, we could easily act in ways that make its vision a reality. Given how weak the Islamic State is today, the last thing we should do is encourage anyone to see it as heroic or farsighted."