237 Items

A photo of the Bundesverfassungsgericht ("Federal Constitutional Court") in Karlsruhe, Germany.

Flickr/Al Fed

Policy Brief

Pushing the EU to a Hamiltonian Moment: Germany’s Court Ruling and the Need to Build a Fiscal Capacity Force a Constitutional Debate

May 20, 2020

The recent ruling of the German Constitutional Court on the ECB was an economic and political bombshell. The deep controversy that resulted – within Germany and on a European scale – illustrates that the ambiguity surrounding the euro area’s legal order and architecture may have reached its limit.

Boris Johnson addresses reporters.

U.S. State Department Photo / Public Domain

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Letter from London on the coronavirus: An order to stay apart brought us together

| Apr. 02, 2020

Dear America,

In London there is much talk of a new “spirit of the Blitz” in the face of another deadly threat to us all.

But 80 years on, that spirit is expressing itself very differently. When the Luftwaffe bombs fell, to continue with normal life was an act of patriotic defiance. Now as COVID-19 spreads, to continue with normal life is an act of punishable deviance.

A magnified image of the Cornoavirus

U.S. Department of State

Newspaper Article - Le Monde

« La Crise du Coronavirus Ébranle Aussi L’idée de Démocratie et de Liberté »

| Mar. 26, 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has shaken our economic and political institutions. Less detectably, the crisis also rattles our ideals of democracy and individual freedom. Public health imperatives have collided with democratic principles as fundamental as the freedom to come and go. We have every reason to believe that the exigencies of the moment will also come into conflict with privacy.

President Donald J. Trump delivers remarks at a press briefing.

Shealah Craighead / Official White House Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Affairs

How to Lead in a Time of Pandemic

| Mar. 25, 2020

The world has never before confronted a crisis quite like COVID-19, one that has simultaneously tested both the limits of public health systems everywhere and the ability of countries to work together on a shared challenge. But it is in just such moments of crisis that, under all prior U.S. presidents since World War II, the institutions of U.S. foreign policy mobilize for leadership. They call nations to action. 

International travelers, some wearing protective masks and gloves, wait in line.

Glenn Fawcett / U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Analysis & Opinions

Corona Crisis, Great Britain, Greece, Belgium

| Mar. 20, 2020

How does the coronavirus change international relations? After the corona crisis, little will remain at the international level as it was before. A change in the balance of power is already becoming apparent: countries that are better able to cope with the crisis are likely to expand their influence, especially China, others will lose. And the border barriers within the EU represent a massive burden for cooperation in the EU. How can and should states react to this? Cathryn Clüver-Ashbrook, political scientist and expert for international and European relations at Harvard University, analyzes this in an interview.

President Donald Trump

Mandel Ngan / AFP via Getty

Analysis & Opinions

The Day That Trump Failed to End Globalization

| Mar. 16, 2020

Often, crises are moments of truth. Some leaders prove in these moments to be up to the stakes, others collapse. The forces behind decisions, interests and ideologies become clearer. President Tump's solemn address to the American nation on Wednesday evening on the coronavirus crisis deserves a special mention. On that day, Donald Trump was preparing to put an end to the world economy as we knew it.