143 Items

European Commission Ursula von der Leyen speaks at the EU-China leaders' meeting

REUTERS/Yves Herman

Analysis & Opinions - Internationale Politik Quarterly

Bonding over Beijing

| Oct. 02, 2020

Over the past few years, China’s rise has become a top priority in Washington and in many European capitals—and a big-ticket item on the wider transatlantic agenda. However, the United States and Europe have so far not been able to capitalize on this convergence by building anything resembling a coherent agenda to address jointly shared challenges from China. This task will be among the most pressing on the transatlantic agenda over the next four years. 

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen delivers her speech during a debate on a proposed mandate for negotiations for a new partnership with the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, at the European Parliament in Strasbourg, eastern France, Tuesday, Feb.11, 2020.

AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias

Analysis & Opinions - Lawfare

Europe Needs a China Strategy; Brussels Needs to Shape It

| Feb. 09, 2020

Europe’s momentum in developing a clear-eyed approach toward China has stalled. In March 2019, the European Commission issued a white paper naming China a systemic rival and economic competitor. That publication marked a fundamental shift in how far European institutions were willing to go in raising the challenges China poses to Europe’s openness and prosperity.

Joel Brenner, Meicen Sun, and Daniel Weitzner

Belfer Center/Benn Craig

Analysis & Opinions - Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship

Profit, Privacy, Power: China's Digital Rise and a US-EU Response

    Author:
  • Winston Ellington Michalak
| Dec. 20, 2019

In an event co-hosted by the Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship’s (PETR) and the Asia Center, Cathryn Clüver Ashbrook, Executive Director of the Future of Diplomacy Project and the Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship, moderated a panel discussion on China’s technological rise and its impact on the US-EU relationship. The panel featured Joel Brenner, Senior Research Fellow at the Center for International Studies; Danil Kerimi, Head of Technology Industries Sector, Digital Economy and Global Technology Policy, the World Economic Forum; Meicen Sun, PhD Candidate in the Department of Political Sciences at MIT; and Daniel Weitzner, Founding Director of the Internet Policy Research Initiative. 

Announcement - Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship

New Event Series: “China’s Rise and the Future of the Transatlantic Relationship”

| Nov. 07, 2019

The Project on Europe and the Transatlantic Relationship (PETR) and the Asia Center will be hosting a new event series over the course of the Fall and Spring semesters of the 2019-2020 academic year, focusing on China's rise and its implications on the transatlantic relationship.

Ambassador Nicholas Burns Speaks to ABC Australia About NATO

ABC News Australia

Analysis & Opinions - ABC

Planet America

| Apr. 05, 2019

Nicholas Burns was Ambassador to NATO under Bush Jr. and director of Soviet and Russian Affairs under Bush Sr. He speaks to Planet America’s John Barron about his concerns for the future of NATO under President Donald Trump.

NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenber Meets with US President Donald Trump

Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

NATO Chief’s Invitation to Address Congress Points to Divide Between Trump, GOP Leaders Over Alliance’s Value

| Apr. 02, 2019

NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg’s appearance in Washington is highlighting a rare point of contention between President Trump and congressional Republicans, who continue to hold diverging views over the value of a military alliance that is celebrating its 70th anniversary this week.

Chinese President Xi Jinping (R) and Italian President Sergio Mattarella attend a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on February 22, 2017. 

AFP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The Diplomat

Italy’s Risky China Gamble

| Mar. 14, 2019

As the first G-7 country to sign a memorandum of understanding on the BRI, Italy’s participation would carry large symbolic weight for China. But this would hardly be enough to legitimize the BRI amid a global backlash against it and Beijing’s own struggles with piling debt and a slowing economy in the throes of a trade war with the United States. Instead, U.S. diplomats correctly warn that it would harm Italy’s own reputation.

Astana, Kazakhstan

Getty Images

Analysis & Opinions

Kazakhs Wary of Chinese Embrace as BRI Gathers Steam

| Feb. 28, 2019

Following on our annual conference, in which China’s Belt and Road Initiative was discussed in detail, Philippe Le Corre of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at the Harvard Kennedy School writes about the perceptions that Beijing will have to overcome in Kazakhstan, where the government is keen on investment, but the people less so.