913 Events

John Holdren

NASA/Bill Ingalls

Seminar - Open to the Public

Energy Policy Seminar: John Holdren on "Thawing Permafrost: A Local and Global Disaster"

Mon., Nov. 2, 2020 | 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Online

Join us for an Energy Policy Seminar featuring John Holdren, Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at HKS. Professor Holdren will speak on "Thawing Permafrost: A Local and Global Disaster." The seminar will be hosted by HKS Professor Joe Aldy.

Attendance: This event is open to the public and hosted on Zoom. For those who cannot attend live, the seminar will be recorded and available to watch via the EPSS homepage.

Registration: Please RSVP at the link below. Registration will remain open until the event begins.

    A deserted classroom in Pripyat, Ukraine, three decades after the Chernobyl disaster, 10 March 2013.

    Wikimedia CC/DmytroChapman

    Seminar - Open to the Public

    Recent Lessons for the Recovery from Acts of Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism

    Thu., Oct. 29, 2020 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

    Online

    Speaker: Julius Weitzdörfer, Junior Professor of East Asian Law, Hagen University, Germany

    Risks stemming from CBRN-terrorism (chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear) are characterized by relatively low frequency, yet extraordinary potential impact. To help reduce the enormous potential costs associated with radiological and nuclear terrorism, drawing on cases from Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States, this seminar seeks to derive and improve recovery policies towards a well-rounded, holistic approach to mitigating the risks of nuclear and radiological terrorism.

    Everyone is welcome to join us online via Zoom! Register in advance for this meeting: https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAoc-yhrjwrEtEXOUTdHqGhMvLscB5VO38u

    Gabrielle Scrimshaw speaks at the Arctic Innovation Lab, 15-Nov-2017.

    Photo Credit: Benn Craig

    Seminar - Open to the Public

    Arctic Innovation Lab: New Ideas For a Better Arctic

    Fri., Oct. 9, 2020 | 10:30am - 12:30pm

    Online

    The Arctic Innovation Lab is a project designed to promote solution-oriented discussions on the changing Arctic region. 

    Come hear new ideas for a better Arctic and vote for your favorite one!

    Opening remarks by Kenneth A. Howery, U.S. Ambassador to Sweden and Co-Founder of Paypal and the Founders Fund

    A Kiruna heritage building being moved intact in August 2017.

    Tomas Utsi/www.naturfoto.com

    Workshop - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

    What Does It Take to Move a City? Arctic Initiative and Luleå University Student Arctic Dialogue

    Fri., Oct. 2, 2020 | 9:30am - 11:00am

    Online

    The world's biggest underground iron ore mine is about to undermine the Swedish city of Kiruna. The answer? Move the city.

    Join the Arctic Initiative for a conversation with students from Luleå University and experts from across the globe for a case discussion about sustainable development, consensus building, and how one Arctic city is responding to rapid change.

    Apply to be part of this unique case discussion opportunity by Monday, September 28, 2020, so you can be matched with your international team.

    Seminar - Open to the Public

    ARCTIC PERMAFROST THAW: SCIENCE & POLICY

    Fri., Sep. 25, 2020 | 1:00pm - 3:00pm

    Online

    A Climate Week Event co-organized by the Woodwell Climate Research Center and the Arctic Initiative

    This session focuses on a warming-driven phenomenon—the rapid thawing of Arctic permafrost—that is contributing simultaneously to the most vexing of Arctic warming’s impacts both in the region and around the world. This session will target experts and non-experts who are interested in understanding the science and policy issues at the heart of this widely underestimated facet of the global climate-change challenge.

    Register here.

    Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin in Helsinki in July 2018.

    Wikimedia Commons

    Seminar - Open to the Public

    The Future World Order: Arms Control

    Fri., Sep. 25, 2020 | 12:30pm - 2:00pm

    Online

    The Project on Managing the Atom and International Security Program at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs will host a discussion on the future of arms control, as part of a new HKS series on The Future World Order.  The participants will be Emma Belcher (Ploughshares Fund), Matthew Bunn (Belfer Center/Managing the Atom) and Steven E. Miller (Belfer Center/International Security Program).  Professor Stephen Walt (Belfer Center/ISP) will moderate.

    Snowmobiles in  Nordreisa, Norway

    Unsplash/Vidar Nordli-Mathisen

    Study Group - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

    Arctic Knowledge Systems Study Group

    Tue., Sep. 15, 2020 - Tue., Oct. 20, 2020

    Online

    Study Group Leader: Joel Clement, Senior Fellow, Arctic Initiative

    The Arctic Knowledge Systems Study Group will explore ways to collaboratively employ indigenous and scientific knowledge to improve resilience in the Arctic. It will consist of 6 sessions in which we will discuss inclusion of indigenous perspectives and how to improve for the future. All sessions will be held on Tuesdays beginning September 15 from 12:00pm - 1:00pm (ET).

    Space is limited! To apply to join the study group please email Brittany Janis your resume and 100 words on why you are interested in participating. 

    Artificial Intelligence Graphic

    www.iqlect.com

    Seminar - Open to the Public

    Belfer Policy Chat | An Ethical Approach to AI & Governance

    Tue., Aug. 4, 2020 | 1:00pm - 2:00pm

    Online

    Gretchen Greene, Technology and Public Purpose Project research fellow, and Hong Qu, the Research Director on the Council on the Responsible Use of Artificial Intelligence, will discuss their research on AI and governance from challenging the use of facial recognition, to mitigating consequences from biased training data sets, to working with local officials to ensure that the use of AI technology in public policy does not perpetuate historical inequities.

    Registration is required. Please click here to register for this event. 

    Cascade of gas centrifuges used to produce enriched uranium in the U.S. gas centrifuge plant in Piketon, Ohio, 1984.

    DOE Photo

    Seminar - Open to the Public

    A-Bomb for the People: Domestic Drivers of Nuclear Latency

    Thu., June 4, 2020 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

    Online

    Speakers: Rebecca Davis Gibbons, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom; Ariel Petrovics, Stanton Nuclear Security Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

    Though only nine states in the world today are believed to possess their own nuclear weapons, many more states have the capability to pursue a nuclear bomb if they choose. This capability – or nuclear latency – has recently drawn attention in international relations scholarship, which largely focuses on the effects of latency on international deterrence, compellence, and bargaining. While this research helps explain the security benefits and motives that may drive states to pursue nuclear capabilities short of the bomb, it has yet to determine how domestic politics play into these considerations. This project explores how public opinion factors into state decisions to pursue or forgo latent nuclear capabilities. In doing so, it seeks to offer new insight into when and why latency can become a salient topic to domestic audiences, and the implications of these domestic drivers for the future of nonproliferation.

    Everyone is welcome to join us online via Zoom! Please register in advance for this seminar:
    https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJwuc-qrqj4pG90vSX2_VoG35zaE6L6mkPQt

    A nuclear advanced designated marksman assists in a launch facility exercise.

    USAF/Beau Wade, 341st Missile Wing Public Affairs

    Seminar - Open to the Public

    A Sense of Purpose: The Bedrock of the U.S. Nuclear Deterrent

    Thu., May 21, 2020 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

    Online

    Speaker: Lt. Col. William C. Smith, Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

    How do leaders motivate Airmen to give their best to perform this unsung duty, day after day, for years at a time? A recent study found clarity of purpose to be the basis of verifiable mission success, purposeful leadership, and esprit de corps, which suggests that clearly communicating the higher purpose of their work to Airmen would help them find meaning in their tasks. A sense that their work is meaningful, the result of internalizing a higher purpose, underpins the safety and security cultures critical to a successful nuclear enterprise. The speaker will build on their findings by introducing five leadership concepts, identifying the particular importance each plays in providing a credible nuclear deterrent, and offering an effective method for implementation. These principles have broad application to organizational leadership as a whole, and if collectively and effectively implemented, would provide the bedrock for safe, secure, and effective nuclear operations.

    Everyone is welcome to join us online via Zoom! Please register in advance for this seminar:
    https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEvdO-sqT4oH9VljkvSrgNBBGATIdqGjGBY