910 Events

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Spyware in The Time of COVID-19

Thu., Apr. 9, 2020 | 12:00pm - 1:00pm

Online

Citizen Lab Senior Researcher John Scott-Railton will speak on the growing market for commercial spyware, which is fueling surveillance abuses around the world. This event will be moderated by Bruce Schneier, Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School. It is sponsored by the Belfer Center's Science, Technology and Public Policy Program and the Council for the Responsible Use of AI.

Shanghai at night

Kido Dong/Unsplash

Seminar - Open to the Public

Opportunities and Challenges in China's Carbon Market: From Model to Reality

Thu., Dec. 5, 2019 | 3:45pm - 5:00pm

School of Engineering and Applied Sciences - Pierce Hall

A Harvard-China Project Research Seminar with Cecilia Han Springer, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Environment and Natural Resources and Science, Technology and Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School. This event will be held in Pierce Hall, Room #100F.

Sponsored by the Harvard-China Project on Energy, Economy, and Environment; Harvard Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS); and the Environment and Natural Resources Program (ENRP) at Harvard Kennedy School.

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

A Conversation with Three Indigenous Women Leaders

Tue., Oct. 29, 2019 | 4:00pm - 5:30pm

Littauer Building - Room 332

Moderator: Joel Clement, Senior Fellow, Arctic Initiative

Speakers: Gunn-Britt Retter, Head, Arctic and Environmental Unit, Saami Council

Deenaalee Hodgdon, Student, Brown University; Indigenous Activist

Raina Thiele, Founder and President; Thiele Strategies

Join the Arctic Initiative for an engaging and illuminating conversation with three indigenous leaders: Gunn-Britt Retter, Head of Arctic and Environmental Unit of the Saami Council; Deenaalee Hodgdon, Brown University student and indigenous activist, who is a Deg Hit'an Athabaskan and Supiaq woman from the villages of Anvik and South Naknek, Alaska; and Raina Thiele, Founder and President of Thiele Strategies who was born and raised in Alaska and is Dena'ina Athabascan and Yup'ikas.

Please RSVP to Brittany_Janis@hks.harvard.edu.

The U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Lexington (CVA-16) underway in the Western Pacific, with Carrier Air Group 21 (CVG-21), on 16 August 1958. Just 8 days later, on 24 August, Communist Chinese artillery began shelling the Nationalist Chinese islands of Quemoy and Matsu, prompting the Blue Ghost's (as Lexington was called) deployment to the Taiwan Straits at various times during the next 4 months, along with other units of the U.S. Seventh Fleet.

U.S. Navy

Seminar - Open to the Public

Playing with Fire: Provocation, Signaling, and Unwanted Crisis Escalation

Thu., Oct. 17, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Hyun-Binn Cho, Postdoctoral  Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

During international crises, states often take costly actions to signal resolve. Such coercive actions, however, can put greater political and psychological pressure on the opponent to counter-escalate. When costly signals are more "provocative," do they make unwanted crisis escalation more likely, or do they make the signal-sender look tough and help induce the opponent to back down? Indeed, why do states sometimes appear to deliberately engage in provocative actions to demonstrate resolve? This seminar addresses these puzzles using game-theoretic analysis and two case studies of crises involving China and the United States.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

2018 Arctic Innovator, Reine Rambert, pitches at the Arctic Innovation Lab

Belfer Center/Benn Craig

Seminar - Open to the Public

Four Ideas for a Changing Arctic — Pitches from the 2019 Harvard University Arctic Innovators

Fri., Oct. 4, 2019 | 12:00pm - 1:15pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

Each year the Belfer Center's Arctic Initiative sends a delegation of students to attend the world’s largest Arctic gathering, the Arctic Circle Assembly. This year, after a competitive application process, four students were selected to represent Harvard at the Arctic Innovation Lab. Come and hear their presentations before they leave for Iceland to pitch their ideas for a changing Arctic. 

Lunch will be provided.

Please RSVP to brittany_janis@hks.harvard.edu by October 2 to secure your seat.

Earth at night

NASA

Workshop - Open to the Public

Development in the Data Economy Workshop

Fri., Sep. 13, 2019 | 8:30am - 5:15pm

Harvard Law School - Wasserstein Hall, Milstein West A

A one day workshop will be hosted by the Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society. The event will focus on creating fairer data markets, exploring new business and governance models to harness personal and non-personal data, and enabling competitive forms of governance to benefit the needs of local businesses and people in all countries regardless of their level of development.

The workshop has limited places available, to express your interest to attend the meeting, click here.

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Greenland in a Changing Arctic

Wed., Sep. 11, 2019 | 12:15pm - 1:30pm

Littauer Building - Belfer Center Library, Room 369

Speaker: Ane Lone Bagger, Minister of Education, Culture, Church, and Foreign Affairs, Greenland

Moderator: Halla Hrund Logadóttir, Co-Founder and Co-Director, Arctic Initiative

Greenland, the world's biggest island, has long held a strategic geographic and political position in global affairs. It has made headlines recently, after President Donald Trump stated he wanted to buy the island, because of its strategic location in the Arctic and its wealth of natural resources. Greenland's foreign minister, Ane Lone Bagger, had told Reuters: "We are open for business, but we’re not for sale."

 Join the Arctic Initiative for an insightful lunch with Greenland's Minister of Education, Culture, Church and Foreign Affairs, Ane Lone Bagger, about how Greenland is responding to the shifting dynamics in the Arctic as climate change is transforming the island and the waters surrounding it, opening up the region to the outside world.

Lunch provided. 

This event is currently at capacity. To be added to the wait-list please email brittany_janis@hks.harvard.edu by 4 PM, Monday, September 9th, 2019. RSVPs recorded on a first-requested, first-reserved basis.

Arctic Innovators at the 2018 Arctic Innovation Lab in Reykjavik, Iceland, celebrating a successful Innovation Lab with Arctic Initiative co-Founder Halla Hrund Logadottir (right).

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

Information Session - Harvard Students

Arctic Innovator Information Session

Wed., Sep. 4, 2019 | 5:30pm - 6:30pm

Belfer Building - Hauser Conference Room (1st Floor Lobby)

This year, the Belfer Center's Arctic Initiative is selecting a small group of 2–3 Harvard students to present their ideas at the Arctic Innovation Lab in Iceland. The Lab takes place at the world's largest Arctic gathering, the Arctic Circle Assembly, from October 10–13, 2019.  The trip for students selected for the Lab is funded by the Arctic Initiative. Before traveling to Iceland, students are expected to attend three, 1-hour, group sessions which will support students in the process of developing their ideas. Students are also required to set up office-hours with members of the Arctic Initiative team as they work independently to hone their pitch.

Students interested in applying to be an Arctic Innovator should fill out this application form by September 6 to be considered for the program: https://forms.gle/yxCWGpW4xqrhVnjX6.

Yellow cake uranium is a solid form of uranium oxide produced from uranium ore. Yellow cake must be processed further before it is made into nuclear fuel.

Wikimedia CC/Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Seminar - Open to the Public

Foreign Skeletons in Nuclear Closets: Implications for Policy and Verification

Thu., May 23, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Sébastien Philippe, Stanton Nuclear Security Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

Most successful nuclear weapons programs have benefited from significant foreign assistance for the acquisition of nuclear materials, sensitive equipment, and know-how. Such assistance is often kept secret, even after states decide to put an end to their nuclear weapons programs or ambitions. This seminar will discuss the policy and verification implications of this source of opacity on the reconstruction of past nuclear military activities as part of non-proliferation or denuclearization agreements.  It will build upon an historical and technical analysis of nuclear assistance between France, Israel, and South Africa and conclude by discussing the impact of discovering previously hidden information on existing policies and ongoing diplomatic processes.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.

A forklift shovels one-ton containers of mustard gas over the side of a barge somewhere in the Atlantic Ocean in 1964. The Army dumped millions of pounds of chemical warfare agent over decades in this way.

U.S. Army

Seminar - Open to the Public

WMD Disposal, Destruction, and Disarmament: The Reduction of U.S. Chemical and Nuclear Weapon Stockpiles

Thu., May 16, 2019 | 12:15pm - 2:00pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker:  Cameron Tracy, Stanton Nuclear Security Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

States often spend vast sums on weapon production, yet have trouble mustering the resources necessary to eliminate stockpiled weapons for arms control and disarmament purposes. Stockpile reductions have proven particularly challenging with respect to weapons of mass destruction, for which weaponizability is embedded in materials rather than assembled devices. Their elimination commonly requires expensive, technologically demanding processes. U.S. chemical weapon and weapons plutonium stockpile reduction efforts provide useful case studies for investigation of the factors governing the success of reductions programs, as they faced similar challenges yet yielded divergent outcomes. This project involves comparative analysis of both reductions programs, focusing on the technical, organizational, and sociopolitical contexts that aided or hindered elimination.

Please join us! Coffee and tea provided. Everyone is welcome, but admittance will be on a first come–first served basis.