120 Items

Blue LED Christmas lamps and reflection on wall

Creative Commons/Alexofdodd

Analysis & Opinions - MRS Bulletin Energy Quarterly

Engineering Research: An Underinvested-in Weak Link in the Energy Innovation Ecosystem

| Dec. 08, 2017

"Engineering research, the exploration of new tools and technologies for manipulating and observing our world, has long been vital to humanity. The invention of the blue LED...is just one recent example—one that, along with many others such as the light bulb, the steam engine, and solar photovoltaics, is transforming humanity's relationship with energy. Perhaps most importantly, engineering research does not follow from (and the blue LED even contradicted!) the scientific understanding of the time. Engineering research has a way of surprising us, most notably when it provides new windows into nature."

U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz and Head of the Iranian Atomic Energy Organization Ali Akbar Salehi, left, meet at an hotel in Vienna, July 9, 2015

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Scientific American

How International Cooperation in Research Advances Both Science and Diplomacy

| Apr. 27, 2017

"The partial budget blueprint released by the White House recently will put U.S. leadership in science and technology at serious risk if Congress goes along. In addition to the obvious damage that would result from the proposed $5.8 billion cut at NIH, the $2 billion cut in applied energy R&D, the $900 million cut in DOE’s Office of Science, the abolition of ARPA-E, and the research cuts at NOAA and EPA, a less immediately obvious potential casualty would be U.S. scientific cooperation with a wide variety of other countries on a wide variety of topics."

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Analysis & Opinions - The Philomathia Foundation

Fellow Spotlight: Junling Huang, University of California, Berkeley

| Nov. 29, 2016

"The objective of my PhD research is to seek efficient strategies to utilize renewable energy resources and transition towards a low-carbon energy system. My research has practical implications for policy-makers to design scientifically sound policy for promoting renewable energy, and for energy investors and developers to make more accurate valuations on their projects."

Solar Panels in use near the 'Hornbill Dormitory' at at Parambikulam Tiger Reserve, Palakkad, Kerala, India. Photo Credits: Manukrishna CK, Praveen R, Parambikulam Tiger Conservation Foundation.

Creative Commons

Analysis & Opinions - The Conversation

On Climate, Developing Countries Need More Than Betting Billions on Clean Energy Breakthroughs

| December 10, 2015

"What's missing from the technology discussions in the climate arena is a focus on a much more important and urgent issue: how to ensure that cleaner energy technologies available today are deployed quickly and at scale in developing countries. Moving their energy systems on a lower-carbon trajectory in the short term is critical because these countries need more energy to fuel their economies and are rapidly growing their energy infrastructure."

A coal mine near Hailar, northeastern Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China, 13 August 2005.

Herry Lawford Photo

Analysis & Opinions - The South China Morning Post

China's Coal Addiction a Threat to Its Energy Security

| May 14, 2014

"...[U]ntil now, Beijing's response to unmet energy demand has focused primarily on securing resources overseas, and building infrastructure for imports. China now generates more electricity from imported coal than from nuclear, wind and solar combined. Without a strong, coordinated policy shift, the country will depend on fuel imports for most of its energy consumption by the time it becomes a developed country."

Geothermal borehole house in Iceland, 14 March 2008.

Lydur Skulason Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Power & Policy Blog

OPEC Embargo +40: What Have We Learned?

| October 18, 2013

"If countries have learned anything, it is that they can protect themselves and become more resilient if they adopt policies and programs that increase their energy self-sufficiency. It turns out that this can be done much more quickly than anyone thought, if they build on what they have."

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

Now is the Time to Be Bold: A Call for New Technology, Policy... and Thinking

| April 20, 2011

"The bottom line is that the United States must invest now in the development and implementation of new energy technologies. We need a new menu of energy options, which means: stable funding for energy R&D; strong incentives to pull new technologies into the market place; and effective mechanisms to ensure that technologies have a chance to compete."

In this April 30, 2009 photo, a carbon dioxide capture system is seen under construction at American Electric Power's Mountaineer Plant in New Haven, W.Va.

AP Photo

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

CCS: Competitive Today. We Cannot Wait until Tomorrow

| March 8, 2010

"Since last year, American Electric Power Mountaineer has employed CCS on a smaller scale of about 30 megawatts and, as such, is a unique example of CCS technology working today. As CCS scales up from this small size, the risks of capture and transport are negligible, making larger plants possible. Because renewables, for various reasons, cannot be implemented at the large scale sufficient to meet the 80 percent emissions reduction goals, we must deploy CCS for larger-scale commercialization. As a crucial means of decarbonizing some industrial processes, CCS will reduce emissions across industries, allowing chemical producers, for example, to meet their targets."