139 Items

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Policy Brief - Migration Policy Institute

Migration Management and Border Security: Lessons Learned

| September 2021

Two decades into the 21st century, both the European Union and the United States have faced considerable challenges in managing migration and borders. Globally, the number of international migrants has grown considerably, reaching 281 million as of 2020. And large-scale irregular migration has strained the infrastructure, legal systems, and often the social and political fabric of the nations encountering it. This personal reflection, written by a former high-ranking official in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, examines the strategic lessons that can be learned from recent migration events that have severely stressed border authorities in North America and Europe.

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Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Integration of Effort

| Sep. 02, 2021

The U.S. currently defines critical infrastructure as “the systems and assets, whether physical or virtual, so vital . . . that the incapacity or destruction of such systems and assets would have a debilitating impact on security, national economic security, national public health or safety, or any combination of those matters.” 

Because most critical infrastructure is owned by private firms, the government must engage with industry in order to secure them. 

A proof of vaccination sign is posted at a bar in San Francisco

AP/Haven Daley

Analysis & Opinions - The Atlantic

Unvaccinated People Need to Bear the Burden

| Aug. 03, 2021

Juliette Kayyem explains that rather than mandating COVID-19 vaccinations, institutions are shifting burdens to unvaccinated people—denying them access to certain spaces, requiring them to take regular COVID-19 tests, charging them for the cost of that testing—rather than imposing greater burdens on everyone. 

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Announcement - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Chris Krebs Named Senior Fellow at Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center

| July 29, 2021

Christopher (Chris) Krebs, former Director of the Department of Homeland Security’s Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), has been named a non-resident Senior Fellow with the Homeland Security Project and the Cyber Project at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs.

A worker helps to pump gas

AP/Chris Carlson

Analysis & Opinions - Harvard Law Today

Is the U.S. in a Cyber War?

    Author:
  • Jeff Neal
| July 14, 2021

In the wake of a series of damaging cyber intrusions on private businesses controlling critical pieces of U.S. infrastructure, Harvard Kennedy School Senior Lecturer Juliette Kayyem says that countering the growing threat will require erasing the "legal fiction" that cyberattacks are different than physical attacks on American civilians.

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Paper

Disrupting Transnational Criminal Activity: A Law Enforcement Strategy for Homeland Security

| May 21, 2021

Transnational criminal activity, organized or not, presents a substantial internal security threat to the United States as it does to other nation-states across the world. Combating it remains a critical mission in the homeland security enterprise. Federal efforts across that enterprise, however, remain scattered and largely ineffectual, and many types of transnational crime are resistant to the law enforcement tactics used domestically.

This paper proposes that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) take the lead in supplementing the traditional “criminal justice” approach to countering transnational crime with strategies that aim to disrupt it and insulate Americans from its harmful effects. We contend the “Disruption Model” outlined here,* if broadly implemented, could significantly complement the current conventional approach, and produce materially improved results in managing the challenges of transnational crime and protecting the homeland from its ravages.