583 Events

President Jimmy Carter along with George M. Seignious, right, director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency briefs community leaders on SALT II at the White House in Washington, Oct. 12, 1979.

AP/Charles Tasnadi

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

A Strange Arms Debate: Legitimation, Essential Equivalence, and Carter's Nuclear Strategy

Thu., Feb. 1, 2024 | 12:15pm - 1:45pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Colleen Larkin, Research Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom

President Jimmy Carter entered office committed to reducing the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. foreign policy. He espoused the logic of mutually assured destruction and hoped for major arms control progress. Yet by the end of his presidency, he had embraced a competitive nuclear posture and accelerated the arms race. What explains this shift in Carter’s strategy? 

Open to Harvard ID Holders Only: Admittance will be on a first come–first served basis. Coffee &Tea Provided.

A phone screenshot with notifications from a Ukrainian air raid app.

Mariana Budjeryn

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Impressions from a Journey to Ukraine

Thu., Jan. 25, 2024 | 12:15pm - 1:45pm

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Mariana Budjeryn, Senior Research Associate, Project on Managing the Atom

What is it like living in a country at war? How does the war imprint itself on everyday life, on holidays and celebrations, on work and art, even far away from the active front line, in the deep rear? Mariana Budjeryn traveled to visit her family in Lviv, western Ukraine, over the holiday break. She shares her impressions and reflections on life amid Christmas carols and air raid sirens and on how ordinary people contribute to the war effort and cope with the losses and grief it inflicts, amid uncertain prospects for its conclusion.

Open to Harvard ID Holders Only: Admittance will be on a first come–first served basis. Coffee &Tea Provided.

Image of French nuclear weapons testing

Pierre J. on Flickr, under creative commons

Seminar - Open to the Public

Atomic Voices: Redressing Nuclear Harm: Transitional Justice in the Nuclear Age

Fri., Dec. 1, 2023 | 10:00am - 12:00pm

Online

Redressing Nuclear Harm: Transitional Justice in the Nuclear Age

Nuclear deterrence and disarmament discussions often center on potential future use and threats of use of nuclear weapons. Attention is growing, however, on the harm that nuclear weapons have already done, mostly focused on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings and on nuclear testing impacts. This seminar offers a nuclear justice lens derived from concepts of transitional justice (TJ).

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

The Security Imperative: Pakistan's Nuclear Deterrence & Diplomacy

Thu., Oct. 19, 2023 | 10:00am - 11:30am

One Brattle Square - Room 350

Speaker: Ambassador Zamir Akram, Author, The Security Imperative: Pakistan's Nuclear Deterrence & Diplomacy

Ambassador Akram will discuss his new book, which is an in-depth study of the evolution of Pakistan's nuclear program until it became a reality despite all the international pressures against it and the challenges along the way.

Open to Harvard ID Holders Only: Admittance will be on a first come–first served basis. Coffee, Tea, & Light Refreshments Provided.

event

Seminar - Open to the Public

MTA Seminar with Dmitry Stefanovich

Wed., Sep. 27, 2023 | 10:00am - 11:30am

Online

We welcome you to join us for the weekly MTA seminar with Dmitry Stefanovich.

Harvard and local affiliates are welcome to join us the One Brattle Building, room 401. All others are welcome to join via Zoom (registration link here).

Dmitry will present:

Hypersonic Weapons, Missile Defense and US-RUSSIA Strategic Stability  

event

Seminar - Open to the Public

MTA Seminar with Leonor Tomero

Wed., Sep. 20, 2023 | 10:00am - 11:30am

Online

Leonor Tomero, Visiting Lecturer with the Princeton School of Public and International Affairs, and former US Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear and Missile Defense Policy in the Office of the Secretary of Defense will present, "The US Innovation imperative and the future of the global strategic balance."

Seminar - Harvard Faculty, Fellows, Staff, and Students

Book Talk: Inheriting the Bomb: Ukraine’s Nuclear Disarmament and Why It Matters

Fri., Apr. 7, 2023 | 11:00am - 12:30pm

Taubman Building - Allison Dining Room, 5th Floor

The Project on Managing the Atom (MTA) invites you to attend a discussion of MTA Senior Research Associate Mariana Budjeryn’s bookInheriting the Bomb: The Collapse of the USSR and the Nuclear Disarmament of Ukraine (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2023). Matthew Bunn will provide introductory remarks and Steve Miller will serve as a discussant during the session. For those attending in-person, light breakfast and refreshments will be served at 10:30am. The talk and webinar will begin at 11:00am EDT.

While this event is on the record, the event organizers prohibit any attendees, including journalists, from audio/visual recording or distributing parts or all of the event program without prior written authorization. 

A political cartoon featuring a globe biting down on a nuclear weapon.

https://libraries.uta.edu/ettahulme/image/20105877

Seminar - Open to the Public

Spheres of (In)security: Global Nuclear Order between Past and Future Injustices

Fri., Mar. 17, 2023 | 9:00am - 10:30am

Online

The global nuclear order that comprises nuclear deterrence, nonproliferation, and disarmament is often viewed as discriminatory and increasingly castigated as unjust. Few states got to develop and deploy nuclear weapons in the name of their own security and that of their allies. Most are prohibited from doing so by the international nonproliferation regime. All stand to lose if a nuclear exchange takes place. Russia’s war against Ukraine underscored the inequities and injustices in the global nuclear order built on hierarchical spheres of (in)security. How to define injustice in nuclear affairs? How sustainable is an unjust global nuclear order? At what cost can it be maintained in its present form, and how can it be long tolerated by the future generations? The panel brings together scholars to critically reflect on past, ongoing, and future nuclear injustices – in the context of the war in Ukraine and beyond – to assess the main tensions and pave the way for a research agenda beyond the usual boundaries of the nuclear policy field and community.