1281 Items

Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan, left, speaks next to Deputy Energy Secretary Dan Brouillette, during a news conference

AP/Jacquelyn Martin

Policy Brief - Asia Pacific Leadership Network for Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament; Toda Peace Institute

Nuclear Battleground: Debating the US 2018 Nuclear Posture Review

| June 2018

This Policy Brief compares and contrasts the Trump administration’s 2018 Nuclear Posture Review with past reviews and its Obama predecessor. It concludes that this review offers a much harsher assessment of the security environment; it posits a more expansive role for nuclear weapons; and proposes a substantial de-emphasis on arms control.

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- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

Applying Expertise to Korean Relations

Summer 2018

U.S.-Korea relations, especially related to nuclear weapons issues, have long been a focus of the Belfer Center and its experts, who research, analyze, and take part in relevant security-related activities. The Center-based Harvard Korea Working Group addresses key policy questions about major security transformations on the Korean Peninsula through activities that brings together practitioners, researchers, and professional degree students.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo speaks at the Heritage Foundation, a conservative public policy think tank, in Washington on May 21, 2018. Pompeo issued a steep list of demands Monday that he said should be included in a nuclear treaty with Iran to replace the Obama-era deal, threatening "the strongest sanctions in history" if Iran doesn't change course (J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press).

J. Scott Applewhite/Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - The Hill

Congress Must Manage the Consequences of the Withdrawal From the Iran Nuclear Deal

| May 22, 2018

President Trump’s decision to withdraw from the nuclear agreement with Iran will undermine U.S. power and influence around the world. Congress must closely monitor the reinstatement of sanctions on Iran to reduce the blowback on U.S economic interests, and provide strict oversight of the Trump administration’s evolving strategy toward Iran.

From left, European Union foreign policy chief Federica Mogherini, Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif, French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian, German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas and British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson pose for a photo during a meeting at the Europa building in Brussels. May 15, 2018 (Olivier Matthys/Associated Press, Pool).

Olivier Matthys/Associated Press, Pool

Analysis & Opinions - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

The Iran Deal is a Done Deal

| May 16, 2018

So far, there seems to be a strong lobby in favor of protecting EU business interests in Iran by proposing sanctions-blocking measures to guard against US secondary sanctions. Ultimately, however, it will be business, not political decisions, that will spell the end of the JCPOA— a lesson almost learned in 1982.

President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting at the White House, Wednesday, May 9, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

Analysis & Opinions - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

Taking Stock of the Damage

| May 09, 2018

The coming weeks and months will be consumed with discussion of how to manage the consequences of President Trump’s unilateral withdrawal of the United States from the nuclear agreement with Iran known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). Today, however, it is important to take stock of the damage.

President Donald Trump makes a statement on Iran policy in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House in Washington. October 13, 2017 (Evan Vucci/Associated Press, File).

Evan Vucci/Associated Press, File

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

How Trump Can Fix the Iran Nuclear Deal

| May 07, 2018

President Trump faces a fateful deadline on May 12: to decide whether to keep waiving nuclear-related sanctions on Iran or to rip up the Iran nuclear deal. Fortunately, there is a path that would allow him to fix many of the problems he sees with the deal while keeping Iran hemmed in by the deal’s restraints.

President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron hold hands during a State Arrival Ceremony on the South Lawn of the White House. April 24, 2018 (Andrew Harnik/Associated Press).

Andrew Harnik/Associated Press

Analysis & Opinions - Al-Monitor

Why Europe Could End Up Being Blamed for Nuclear Deal Collapse

| May 07, 2018

The recent visits to Washington by French President Emmanuel Macron and German Chancellor Angela Merkel were in all likelihood the last chance for Europeans to convince President Donald Trump not to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal. With prospects for winning over Trump fading as the May 12 deadline for sanctions waivers approaches, one might argue that US allies in Europe have lost sight of the prize in the process of appeasing him. Indeed, rather than exclusively focusing on addressing Trump’s stated concerns about the deal, which probably cannot be satisfied anyway, France, Germany and the UK, known as the E3, would serve their interests better by laying out alternative strategies for protecting trade between Iran and the European Union should the United States withdraw.