923 Items

(AP Photo/File)

(AP Photo/File)

Journal Article - Perspectives on Politics

Syria, Productive Antinomy, and the Study of Civil War

| December 2018

Review Essay: Civil War in Syria: Mobilization and Competing Social Orders. By Adam Baczko, Gilles Dorronsoro, and Arthur Quesnay. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 336p. $84.99 cloth, $27.99 paper.

The horrors of the ongoing Syrian civil war have never been far from the front pages of the news. Social scientists who wish to study it soon confront the awkward reality that the war’s ferocity precludes field research on its central military and political dynamics. Scholars have made important advances in studying mechanisms behind protest activity and the mobilization of armed opposition to the al-Assad regime, but much work is confined to studying the conflict through the lens of refugees. Adam Baczko, Gilles Dorronsoro, and Arthur Quesnay’s research is all the more indispensable for that context. Scholars of civil war and of autocracies, researchers investigating the 2011 Arab uprisings, and Syria specialists all will find value in their book’s rich pairing of theoretically-driven analysis and empirical material gathered through field research in Syria. 

The members of Arab-Turkish Media Association and friends hold posters as they attend funeral prayers in absentia for Saudi writer Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul, Turkey. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

(AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

Analysis & Opinions - Agence Global

CIA leaks spark new era in Khashoggi case

| Nov. 19, 2018

BOSTON — The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency’s leaks to several American news organizations this weekend that it believes with “high confidence” that Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman ordered the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi has triggered a series of fascinating political contests and confrontations that may profoundly impact several decision-decision-making spheres in Washington, within Saudi Arabia, and between the United States and foreign countries. We enter uncharted terrain here with potentially tumultuous results, largely because of the unprecedented, unpredictable, and mostly uninformed, uncaring, and dangerous nature of the Trump presidency and the rule of Mohammad Bin Salman.

Allison Hartnett, Research Fellow, Middle East Initiative and Ph.D. Candidate in Politics at the University of Oxford, speaks during a Middle East Initiative seminar.

Bennett Craig/Belfer Center

Announcement

MEI at MESA 2018

November 2018

The Middle East Initiative will be well represented at this year's Annual Meeting of the Middle East Studies Association (MESA) in San Antonio, Texas November 15-18. Many current and former MEI fellows and affiliates will present research on a broad variety of topics during the conference. Below is a complete list of MEI-related participants, with links to their panels and topics.

A video image of Hatice Cengiz, fiancee of slain Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Analysis & Opinions - Agence Global

The potential massive consequences of the Khashoggi murder

| Nov. 06, 2018

BEIRUT — Our continued focus on resolving the facts of the murder of Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul last month is important for four reasons that will impact the fate of the Middle East and U.S. policies there for years to come. We will know soon if the killers are held accountable or the world loses attention, succumbs to the allure of the fortunes of oil and gas, and leaves largely unchanged the current power structures of our region. Which of those routes we take will determine whether we generate a more decent, participatory, accountable, and just region, or fall into a death maelstrom of unchallenged and cruel autocracy where money and guns rule, and citizens enjoy neither rights nor humanity.

Women and the Egyptian Revolution Book Cover, Cambridge University Press, 2017.

Cambridge University Press, 2017.

News

Event Podcast: "Book Talk: Women and the Egyptian Revolution: Engagement and Activism During the 2011 Arab Uprisings"

Nov. 06, 2018

A seminar with Nermin Allam, Assistant Professor of Politics at Rutgers University - Newark, on her recent book, Women and the Egyptian Revolution: Engagement and Activism during the 2011 Arab Uprisings(Cambridge University Press, 2017).

Moderated by Hind Ahmed Zaki, Associate at Middle East Initiative, HKS, and Harold Grinspoon Junior Research Fellow, Crown Center for Middle East Studies, Brandeis University.

Egyptians celebrate the news of the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, Feb. 11, 2011. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

(AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Analysis & Opinions - Oxford University Press

Will Egypt Have Another Uprising?

| Oct. 23, 2018

Egypt is well-known for its exceptionally rich history. For many, the country is synonymous with ancient wonders such as the pyramids of Giza and the royal tombs of Luxor. However, in January 2011, modern Egypt suddenly leapt to the center of the public’s imagination. Over a period of 18 days, millions of Egyptians engaged in sit-ins, strikes, and demonstrations as well as pitched battles with the security forces.