Analysis & Opinions - Inkstick

A Journey to the Edge of War and Peace

| Jan. 24, 2023

Amid the wail of sirens, the roar of Shaheds, and the hum of generators, there is a notable, palpable absence of fear in Ukraine.

At the end of December 2022, I traveled to Ukraine to spend a couple weeks with my mom and celebrate old-calendar Christmas. I had not been back since the war started.

Since Feb. 24, 2022, I have followed the war closely, reading everything I could in reputable and not-so-reputable outlets, countless Twitter threads, and Telegram channels, talking daily with my mom, and staying in touch with Ukrainian colleagues and friends. I told my kids to be good, to mind their grades, and to learn to become more self-sufficient, their mother is off to war with Russia, and plunged into work, sharing what counted as my expertise on the history of Ukraine’s nuclear disarmament and Russian nuclear threats in countless interviews, podcasts, conferences, and articles, in English and Ukrainian. I responded to all requests, from CNN to a Jewish radio station in Pretoria. That, and donating to whatever drives hit my radar was the least I could do, I thought.

For more information on this publication: Belfer Communications Office
For Academic Citation: Budjeryn, Mariana.“A Journey to the Edge of War and Peace.” Inkstick, January 24, 2023.

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