16184 Items

The flag of the People’s Republic of China flies on the U.S.S. Ronald Reagan during a port call in Hong Kong, November 21, 2018

AP / Kin Cheung

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Coherence and Comprehensiveness: An American Foreign Policy Imperative

| March 2019

As the United States now confronts the prospect of a multi-faceted and quite possibly generational competition with China—underscored not only by recent Trump Administration public statements but also by the clear emergence of bipartisan support for a firm posture against certain Chinese practices—it is essential that U.S. policymakers take steps to ensure our approach is as coherent and comprehensive as possible. (As we make this point, we offer our hope that the relationship between the U.S. and China, unquestionably the most important in the world, can evolve into one that is mutually beneficial and avoids confrontation.

A global ransomware attack, as shown from the perspective of a computer user in Beijing, May 13, 2017.

Mark Schiefelbein (AP)

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The Mueller Report Won't Fix the Problem Underlying It All

| Mar. 21, 2019

The Mueller report will have fiery consequences—of that, one can be sure. But it won't solve the larger cybersecurity dilemmas facing the American public, David Ignatius warns. And although the military recently began launching counteroffensives against cyber attacks, more steps are urgently needed from other sectors of American society.

Dr. Cheddi Jagan, right, celebrates with his U.S. born wife, Janet, left

AP

Journal Article - Passport: The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Review

Intelligence, U.S. Foreign Relations, and Historical Amnesia

| April 2019

Calder Walton writes that the use and abuse of intelligence is one of the most contested and scrutinized subjects in contemporary news and current affairs. By contrast, for a student of history who is eager to understand the similarities and differences between clandestine operations today and those in the past, there are yawning gaps in the literature and the classroom when it comes to intelligence, U.S. foreign relations, and international relations. These gaps exist even in some of the latest and most authoritative publications, as well as the history classes of major U.S. universities.

Book Chapter - Oxford University Press

Israel's National Security Policy

| 2019

This article presents both the fundamental changes that have taken place in Israel's strategic environment, from conventional, state-based threats to primarily asymmetrical ones, and the responses it has developed to date. It also addresses Israel's relations with the United States and other primary international actors, as well as Israel's nuclear and regional arms control policy.

U.S. Attorney for District of Massachusetts Andrew Lelling

AP Photo/Steven Senne

Analysis & Opinions - The Boston Globe

Americans Don’t Believe in Meritocracy — They Believe in Fake-it-ocracy

| Mar. 18, 2019

Americans believe in meritocracy in principle. Polls show that significant majorities — between 67 percent and 70 percent since Gallup began asking the question in 2003 — believe that, when it comes to university admissions, “applicants should be admitted solely on the basis of merit.” Yet in practice Americans don’t believe in meritocracy at all. A significant number of wealthy Americans have no problem at all with the idea of hereditary privilege, so long as they are spared the social obligations of traditional aristocracy.