63 Items

Tractors on Westminster bridge

AP/Matt Dunham

Paper - Institut für Sicherheitspolitik

The Global Order After COVID-19

| 2020

Despite the far-reaching effects of the current pandemic,  the essential nature of world politics will not be transformed. The territorial state will remain the basic building-block of international affairs, nationalism will remain a powerful political force, and the major powers will continue to compete for influence in myriad ways. Global institutions, transnational networks, and assorted non-state actors will still play important roles, of course, but the present crisis will not produce a dramatic and enduring increase in global governance or significantly higher levels of international cooperation. In short, the post-COVID-19 world will be less open, less free, less prosperous, and more competitive than the world many people expected to emerge only a few years ago.

Analysis & Opinions - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

The Postponement of the NPT Review Conference. Antagonisms, Conflicts and Nuclear Risks after the Pandemic

The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists has published a document from the Pugwash Conference on Science and World Affairs concerning nuclear problems and tensions in the time of COVID-19. The document has been co-signed by a large number of Pugwash colleagues and personalities.

Jan. 10, 2017: a member of the Afghan security forces stands guard near the site of two blasts in Kabul, Afghanistan

AP

Analysis & Opinions - Foreign Policy

'Mission Accomplished' Will Never Come in Afghanistan

| Mar. 28, 2017

"What began in 2001 as a focused effort to topple the Taliban and rout al Qaeda has become an endless, costly, and unrealistic effort with no clearly discernible endpoint and little hope of success. It has become our forgotten war, and the chief aim of those in charge of the operation seems to be keeping it off the front pages and out of the public eye."

From left the right: Reps. Ami Bera (D-CA), Raja Krishnamorthi (D-IL), Ro Khanna (D-CA), and Pramila Jayapal (D-WA).

Courtesy of Congressman Ami Bera.

Analysis & Opinions - Forbes

Indian Americans Are Achieving Unprecedented Success in Public Service

| Jan. 16, 2017

The Indian American community is experiencing unprecedented political success. During last year’s elections, four of its members – Ro Khanna (D-CA), Pramila Jayapal (D-WA), Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) and Kamala Harris (D-CA) – were elected to the United States Congress, while a fifth, Representative Ami Bera (D-CA), won re-election to a third term. This represents the largest number of Indian Americans to ever serve in Congressional history. Judge Dilip Singh Saund became the first Asian American to be elected to Congress in 1956. Nearly four decades later, Bobby Jindal (R-LA) was elected to the House of Representatives from Louisiana before launching a successful gubernatorial bid in the state.

News

Ambassador David Saperstein talks TPP, ISIL, and the Next Administration

| Nov. 28, 2016

David Saperstein, U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Religious Freedom, spoke on Monday, November 14th at the Harvard Kennedy School on “U.S. Efforts to Promote Religious Freedom Abroad.” In a wide-ranging discussion moderated by Future of Diplomacy Project Executive Director Cathryn Clüver, the diplomat and rabbi explained the importance of religion and human rights as part of an integrated approach to foreign policy.