Articles

43 Items

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Correspondence: Clandestine Capabilities and Technological Diffusion Risks

| Fall 2020

David M. Allison and Stephen Herzog respond to Brendan Rittenhouse Green and Austin Long’s winter 2019/20 article, “Conceal or Reveal? Managing Clandestine Military Capabilities in Peacetime Competition.”

In this photo provided by the Department of Defense, President Franklin D. Roosevelt sits in a jeep at Yalta with British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and V.M. Molotov, Feb. 1945.

AP Photo/Department of Defense

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Partnership or Predation? How Rising States Contend with Declining Great Powers

| Summer 2020

When and why do rising states prey upon or support declining powers? A state’s choice of policy toward a declining power depends on two factors: whether that power is useful against challengers to the rising state, and the declining state’s military strength.

Chinese President Xi Jinping poses for photographers after delivering his speech, during a visit at the UNESCO headquarters, in Paris, Thursday March 27, 2014.

AP Photo/Christian Hartmann/Pool

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

China's Grand Strategy under Xi Jinping: Reassurance, Reform, and Resistance

    Author:
  • Avery Goldstein
| Summer 2020

While China’s grand strategy under Xi Jinping is clearly distinctive, it does not fundamentally break with the grand strategy that Chinese leaders have embraced since the early 1990s—one that aims to realize China’s “dream of national rejuvenation.”

Submarine with wake in ocean

(US Navy photo courtesy of US Naval Historical Center via Wikimedia)

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Conceal or Reveal? Managing Clandestine Military Capabilities in Peacetime Competition

| Winter 2019/20

States are more likely to reveal secret military capabilities during peacetime competition when the effects of the asset in question can be substituted with another military advantage and when the adversary is not equipped with countermeasures.

U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Secretary of State John Foster Dulles (from left) greet South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem at Washington National Airport

DoD/Department of the Air Force

Journal Article - Small Wars Journal

Bernard Fall as an Andrew Marshall Avant la Lettre (Part II)

| Dec. 09, 2019

SWJ interview with Nathaniel L. Moir, Ph.D., an Ernest May Postdoctoral Fellow in History and Policy at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School. Dr. Moir is completing a book manuscript on Bernard Fall for publication.

Xi Jingping and other world leaders attend an APEC-ASEAN dialogue.

(Jorge Silva/Pool Photo via AP)

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

China in a World of Orders: Rethinking Compliance and Challenge in Beijing’s International Relations

    Author:
  • Alastair Iain Johnston
| Fall 2019

Rather than debating whether China is challenging a single, U.S.-dominated liberal order, scholars and analysts should consider China’s actions in relation to multiple orders in different domains, where China is supportive of some, unsupportive of others, and partially supportive of still others.

1st Foreign Company parachutist of heavy mortars in Indochina with 2 mortars Brandt 120 mm type A.M. 50

Public Domain/Davric

Magazine Article - War Room

Jungle Mission: A Review

| Oct. 18, 2019

Nathaniel Moir reviews  Jungle Mission by René Riesen. He writes that Jungle Mission exemplifies applied history.  For armed forces engaging with diverse cultures, this book provides an individual precedent and useful analogies that illuminate contemporary problems where cultural intelligence is critical.

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Journal Article - Journal of Conflict Resolution

Invisible Digital Front

| Nov. 10, 2017

Recent years have seen growing concern over the use of cyber attacks in wartime, but little evidence that these new tools of coercion can change battlefield events. We present the first quantitative analysis of the relationship between cyber activities and physical violence during war. Using new event data from the armed conflict in Ukraine—and additional data from Syria’s civil war—we analyze the dynamics of cyber attacks and find that such activities have had little or no impact on fighting.