Articles

112 Items

Chinese President Xi Jinping poses for photographers after delivering his speech, during a visit at the UNESCO headquarters, in Paris, Thursday March 27, 2014.

AP Photo/Christian Hartmann/Pool

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

China's Grand Strategy under Xi Jinping: Reassurance, Reform, and Resistance

    Author:
  • Avery Goldstein
| Summer 2020

While China’s grand strategy under Xi Jinping is clearly distinctive, it does not fundamentally break with the grand strategy that Chinese leaders have embraced since the early 1990s—one that aims to realize China’s “dream of national rejuvenation.”

Police vehicle checkpoint in China

(AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Counterterrorism and Preventive Repression: China’s Changing Strategy in Xinjiang

    Authors:
  • Sheena Chestnut Greitens
  • Myunghee Lee
  • Emir Yazici
| Winter 2019/20

The Chinese Communist Party changed its internal security strategy in Xinjiang in early 2017 because of Beijing’s changing perception of Uyghur involvement in transnational Islamic militancy abroad, which heightened perceived domestic vulnerability to terrorism.

U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Secretary of State John Foster Dulles (from left) greet South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem at Washington National Airport

DoD/Department of the Air Force

Journal Article - Small Wars Journal

Bernard Fall as an Andrew Marshall Avant la Lettre (Part II)

| Dec. 09, 2019

SWJ interview with Nathaniel L. Moir, Ph.D., an Ernest May Postdoctoral Fellow in History and Policy at the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School. Dr. Moir is completing a book manuscript on Bernard Fall for publication.

Xi Jingping and other world leaders attend an APEC-ASEAN dialogue.

(Jorge Silva/Pool Photo via AP)

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

China in a World of Orders: Rethinking Compliance and Challenge in Beijing’s International Relations

    Author:
  • Alastair Iain Johnston
| Fall 2019

Rather than debating whether China is challenging a single, U.S.-dominated liberal order, scholars and analysts should consider China’s actions in relation to multiple orders in different domains, where China is supportive of some, unsupportive of others, and partially supportive of still others.

Chinese military vehicles in parade.

(AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Dangerous Confidence? Chinese Views on Nuclear Escalation

    Authors:
  • Fiona S. Cunningham
  • M. Taylor Fravel
| Fall 2019

China and the United States hold opposing beliefs about whether nuclear war can be avoided in a potential crisis or armed conflict. Taken together, these opposing beliefs increase the risk of nuclear escalation and can lead to greater crisis instability.

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Correspondence: Military-Technological Imitation and Rising Powers

| Fall 2019

Michael C. Horowitz and Shahryar Pasandideh respond to Andrea Gilli and Mauro Gilli’s winter 2018/19 article, “Why China Has Not Caught Up Yet: Military-Technological Superiority and the Limits of Imitation, Reverse Engineering, and Cyber Espionage.”

Solider stand on shore with naval ship in the distance

(AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Cautious Bully: Reputation, Resolve, and Beijing's Use of Coercion in the South China Sea

| Summer 2019

Contrary to the conventional wisdom, China is a cautious bully that seeks to balance between the need to establish resolve and the economic cost of coercion, seen through its territorial disputes in the South China Sea.

Magazine Article - Le Figaro

Les États-Unis et La Chine Se Dirigent Tout Droit Vers La Guerre

| May 03, 2019

Le piège de Thucydides se met en place quand une puissance émergente vient défier la puissance régnante. Ainsi hier Athènes face à Sparte. Et peut-être demain Pékin face à Washington. Telle est la thèse de Graham Allison, professeur émérite à Harvard et conseiller de plusieurs secrétaires d'État à la Défense, dans son livre devenu un best-seller mondial.

(The Thucydides Trap takes place when an emerging power threatens to displace a ruling one. Long ago, in antiquity, it was Athens against Sparta. But tomorrow, it could be Beijing against Washington. Such is the argument made by Graham Allison, emeritus professor at Harvard and advisor to several Secretaries of Defense, in his best-selling book Destined for War: Can America and China Escape the Thucydides Trap? - This English translation from original French by Christian Gibbons, Belfer Center)