Articles

30 Items

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Magazine Article - Forbes

U.S. Ambassador To India Richard Verma Leaves A Lasting Legacy To Follow

| Feb. 03, 2017

Richard Verma’s two-year tenure as U.S. Ambassador to India concluded last month with the new incoming presidential administration. During his time in New Delhi, Verma established himself as one of the most consequential envoys to ever occupy the prestigious post once held by such foreign policy legends as John Kenneth Galbraith and Frank Wisner. The first Indian American to serve in the role, Verma leaves behind a far-reaching legacy. He raised the U.S-India strategic partnership to unparalleled heights in virtually every arena of bilateral cooperation while serving as a skilled and talented public diplomat.

People holding Russian flags rally to celebrate the 2nd anniversary of Russia's annexation of Crimea just off Red Square in Moscow, March 18, 2016. Russia annexed Crimea in 2014 after a hastily organized referendum not recognized by the U.S. & the EU.

AP

Magazine Article - The World Post

Trump Could Turn Western Values Into a Facade

| December 8, 2016

"If there is no American power behind those values, they will become a façade, simple rhetoric. It's a matter of combining values with policy and implementation. Take Russia’s invasion of Crimea, for example. Russian President Vladimir Putin stole land from his neighbor using force ― something that is against any post-1945 agreement. Without U.S.-imposed sanctions, Putin surely would have gotten away with it much easier and perhaps would have continued seizing territory."

Journal Article - European Law Journal

Open Arms Behind Barred Doors: Fear, Hypocrisy and Policy Schizophrenia in the European Migration Crisis

| May 2016

"In 2015, over one million refugees and migrants arrived in Europe, laying bare the limitations of the EU's common border control and burden-sharing systems. This article examines consequences of the EU's disjoint, schizophrenic and, at times, hypocritical responses to what has become known as the European migration crisis."

Sub-Saharan migrants climb over a metallic fence that divides Morocco and the Spanish enclave of Melilla on Friday, March 28, 2014.

Santi Palacios/ AP

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Barriers to Entry: Who Builds Fortified Boundaries and Why

    Authors:
  • Ron E. Hassner
  • Jason Wittenberg
| Summer 2015

Contrary to conventional wisdom, states do not typically construct fortified boundaries in response to border disputes or to prevent terrorism. Instead, most build such boundaries for economic reasons, to keep out unwanted migrants from poorer states. Further, Muslim states are more likely to both build and be the targets of fortified boundaries.

The women in this image are Minova, DRC, rape survivors who are veiled so they cannot be seen or recognized in court during their testimony.

Globalpost image

Journal Article - Journal of Peace Research

Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict: Introducing the SVAC Dataset, 1989–2009

| May 2014

Which armed groups have perpetrated sexual violence in recent conflicts? This article presents patterns from the new Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict (SVAC) dataset. The dataset, coded from the three most widely used sources in the quantitative human rights literature, covers 129 active conflicts, and the 625 armed actors involved in these conflicts, during the period 1989–2009.

Anti-EULEX (European Union Rule of Law Initiative) Graffiti - Mitrovica (Serb Side) - Kosovo, October 26, 2013

Adam Jones, Ph.D. Photo

Journal Article - Nationalities Papers

Towards the Rule of Law in Kosovo: EULEX Should Go

| 2014

Following Kosovo's declaration of independence in February 2008, the European Union deployed a rule of law mission in Kosovo (EULEX). While EULEX and its supporters have argued that the mission has the potential to succeed, critics claim that the mission has failed to significantly improve Kosovo's rule of law institutions, to address the rule of law vacuum in the north of Kosovo, and to prosecute high-level organized crime and corruption.

Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates and U.S. Ambassador to Mexico Carlos Pascual attend the Merida Initiative Plenary, which focuses on helping the Mexican government fight drug-trafficking cartels and other security threats, 23 March 2010.

DoD Photo

Magazine Article - Foreign Policy

Think Again: Mexican Drug Cartels

| November-December 2013

"The cartels, along with the violence and corruption they perpetrate, are threats to both Mexico and the United States. The problem is a complicated one and taps areas of profound policy disagreement. The way to make progress in combating the DTOs is to ignore issues like gun control and illegal immigration and follow the money. Stanching the cartels' profits will do more to end the bloodshed than any new fence or law."