Articles

41 Items

Tufanbeyli Coal-fired Thermal Power Plant

Wikimedia CC/Zeynel Cebeci

Journal Article - Environmental Law

Linking Heterogeneous Climate Policies (Consistent with the Paris Agreement)

| 2018

The Paris Agreement to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has achieved one of two key necessary conditions for ultimate success—a broad base of participation among the countries of the world. But another key necessary condition has yet to be achieved—adequate collective ambition of the individual nationally determined contributions. How can the climate negotiators provide a structure that will include incentives to increase ambition over time? An important part of the answer can be international linkage of regional, national, and sub-national policies.

Arc de Triomphe

Jean-Baptiste Gurliat/ Mairie de Paris

Journal Article

International Climate Change Policy

| 2018

In this review, the authors synthesize the literature on international climate change cooperation and identify key policy implications, as well as those findings most relevant for the research community. Their scope includes critical evaluation of the organization and implementation of agreements and instruments, retrospective analysis of cooperative efforts, and explanations of successes and failures.

Journal Article - Nature Energy

Political Economy of Clinton's Ambitious Energy Program

| October 2016

"Hillary Clinton's campaign has stressed her continuity with Obama's energy policy on key aspects such as decarbonization of the US economy, technological innovation and global cooperation. However, policy reforms to deliver long-term climate goals might be out of reach in a highly divided Congress."

Harvard Project Director Robert Stavins speaking at a side-event panel discussion in Paris on December 4, 2015.

Courtesy of HKS

Magazine Article - Harvard Gazette

Harvard's Stavins, Stowe Compare Climate Change Policies in Paris

    Author:
  • Doug Gavel
| December 6, 2015

"The role of market mechanisms for reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and the relationship between climate change policy and international trade were the topics of a side-event panel discussion on Friday at the Conference of the Parties (COP21), the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Paris. The panel discussion, which was co-sponsored by the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, addressed a variety of issues related to the emissions-reduction targets that countries are putting forward as part of a new agreement to be concluded in Paris."

Daniel Bodansky, Coral Davenport, and Zou Ji discuss what to expect at the U.N. climate talks in Paris in December 2015.

Jon Chase Photo

Magazine Article - Harvard Gazette

Optimism on U.N. Climate Talks

    Author:
  • Alvin Powell
| November 17, 2015

"In addition to U.S. moves toward curbing carbon emissions, international attention on the issue is far more substantial than it was at the time of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, according to panelists. That agreement covered just 14 percent of global carbon emissions, Stavins said. Countries responsible for 90 percent of today's emissions have already committed to voluntary reductions in advance of the Paris talks."

Journal Article - Science

The IPCC at a Crossroads: Opportunities for Reform

    Authors:
  • Carlo Carraro
  • Ottmar Edenhofer
  • Christian Flachsland
  • Charles Kolstad
  • Robert C. Stowe
| October 2, 2015

"The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has proven its value as an institution for large-scale scientific collaboration to synthesize and assess large volumes of climate research for use by policy-makers, as well as for establishing credibility of findings among diverse national governments. But the IPCC has received considerable criticism of both its substance and process."

Magazine Article - Harvard Kennedy School Magazine

From the Ground Up: the Value of the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements is Coming into Clear Focus

    Author:
  • Susannah Ketchum Glass
| Summer 2015

"We insist on being policy-relevant but not policy-prescriptive," Stavins says. "And that is something the negotiating teams appreciate. Whereas many groups have an ax to grind, we do not; we just want to help them understand the nature and dimensions of specific issues and how they can address them."

Magazine Article - Harvard Gazette

A Blessing to Slow Climate Change

| June 18, 2015

"Last year at the United Nations General Assembly, heads of state came together to talk about climate change. We had an announcement on carbon pricing signed on by more than 70 countries, more than 1,000 businesses — reflecting this emerging view of both those in public policy and those using the technologies in the business world — that pricing carbon is the way to get us off of fossil fuels, to create that incentive for the technologies that will allow us to still enjoy the level of economic development that we aspire to, without having an adverse impact on the climate."

Robert N. Stavins, Director of the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Kris Snibbe Photo

Magazine Article - Harvard Gazette

Climate Convergence

    Author:
  • Alvin Powell
| November 12, 2013

Representatives from 195 nations are in Warsaw for a meeting that is expected to lay the groundwork for the next international climate agreement. Kennedy School climate policy expert Robert Stavins, who is in attendance, described it as an important step in the process. "... to me, success depends on whether we're making progress, as opposed to 'solving the problem,' " he said.