Articles

15 Items

Gertrude Kitongo poses with her mobile phone in Johannesburg, South Africa. She cherishes a cell phone as a link to family and friends and also sees it as a radio, a library, a mini cinema, a bank teller, etc., Nov. 8, 2011.

AP Photo

Magazine Article - Finance & Development

Africa's New Engine

| December 2011

Cell phone use has grown faster in Africa than in any other region of the world since 2003....Of course, South Africa—the most developed nation—still has the highest penetration, but across Africa, countries have leapfrogged technology, bringing innovation and connectivity even to remote parts of the continent, opening up mobile banking and changing the way business is done.

Director-general of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization Jose Graziano da Silva looks on during a press conference at the Itamaraty palace in Brasilia, Brazil, Aug. 3, 2011.

AP Photo

Magazine Article - Comments

AgroDiplomacy: Growing Relations between Latin America and Africa

| Julio-Agosto 2011

"The rising concern over global food price volatility has put agriculture at the center of international diplomacy. But unlike the 1950s when food aid became a major tool in international relations, modern interactions among states are being defined by trade and knowledge transfer. A new field — agricultural diplomacy (AgroDiplomacy) — is emerging as countries learn more about their shared ecological experiences and agricultural trade interests. The prospects for building such relations are evident in the rise in cooperation between Africa and Latin America."

Journal Article - International Journal of Technology and Globalisation

Introduction: Global Actors, Markets and Rules Driving the Diffusion of Genetically Modified (GM) Crops in Developing Countries

| 2006

"This introductory essay explains how this new technology is being driven by the actors (multinational corporations), markets (large global markets) and rules (intellectual property) of globalisation."

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Magazine Article - New Scientist

Book Review: Designs on Nature: Science and Democracy in Europe and the United States by Sheila Jasanoff

| Sep. 10, 2005

To the casual observer, French farmers might seem to have little in common with Californian vine growers. They operate on different continents and in different political and, arguably, moral environments. But both groups exist in societies that have benefited from rapid advances in technology in the last century. And despite this, both are united in scepticism of the benefits that the biotechnology industry can offer.