Articles

368 Items

Charles River and Harvard University skyline

Wikimedia CC/Marco Carrasco

Newspaper Article - Harvard Crimson

HKS Prof. Aldy Talks Clean Energy, Economic Policy at Belfer Center Webinar

    Author:
  • Isabella B. Cho
| Oct. 20, 2020

Harvard Kennedy School professor Joseph E. Aldy discussed how policymakers can learn from past models to maximize the impact of current American energy legislation at an October 19 webinar hosted by the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements.

West George Street in Glasgow during coronavirus lockdown.

Wikimedia CC/Daniel Naczk

Magazine Article - Resources Magazine

The State of Global Climate Policy after the Delay of COP26

| May 15, 2020

Former U.S. lead climate negotiator Sue Biniaz shares her thoughts on the postponement of COP26 in this interview by Professor Robert Stavins. Stavins and Biniaz explore ways to reimagine future United Nations climate negotiations, unresolved concerns from COP25, and how the United States might approach rejoining the Paris Agreement.

man helps set up portable fencing

AP/Andrew Harnik

Magazine Article - Resources Magazine

What Economics Can Say about an Effective Response to the Coronavirus

| Apr. 02, 2020

In a recent podcast interview, Robert Stavins and Scott Barrett discussed lessons from historic pandemics, how economists can help with policymaking surrounding the coronavirus, and what the “post-pandemic economic equilibrium” might look like. Resources Magazine has published an abridged version of their conversation.

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Journal Article

Lines, Flows and Transnational Crime: Toward a Revised Approach to Countering the Underworld of Globalization

| Dec. 16, 2019

In this article, we develop a new framework for combating transnational criminal activity. We argue that global illicit flows, perpetrated by organized crime, in the interstices of lawful trade and travel, embody a critical and debilitating non-state security threat in today’s world, one that the Westphalian international system of sovereign states remains ill-equipped to confront. Accordingly, we seek to generate a wider discussion in the field regarding a revised approach to this threat that is situated within a global framework of collaborative law enforcement which incorporates, in appropriate fashion, certain military and counter-terrorist strategies.

The propositions we advance in support of a revised approach to countering transnational crime and its globalized web-enabled criminals include: (a) terrorism is one species of transnational crime; (b) the criminal justice model of arrest, prosecution, conviction and incarceration is a partial and insufficient response to transnational crime; (c) national security and law enforcement functions should be viewed analytically as a “public security” continuum rather than disciplines separated by bright lines; (d) countering transnational criminal organizations effectively may require development of a hybrid law enforcement/military capacity and new strategic and tactical doctrines, including safeguards against abuse, to govern its deployment; (e) joint border management within nations and between them, coordinated with the private sector, is required and inter-agency cooperation and multilateral institutions must be strengthened in accordance with new international norms and (f) North America, a region construed as extending from Colombia to the Arctic and from Bermuda to Hawaii, could develop in the future, together with the European Union, as an initial site for a model pilot of the new approach.

dead common murres lie washed up on a rocky beach

AP/Mark Thiessen, File

Journal Article - Science Advances

The Polar Regions in a 2°C Warmer World

    Authors:
  • Eric Post
  • Richard B. Alley
  • Torben R. Christiansen
  • Marc Macias-Fauria
  • Bruce C. Forbes
  • Michael N. Gooseff
  • Amy Iler
  • Jeffrey T. Kerby
  • Kristin L. Laidre
  • Michael E. Mann
  • Johan Olofsson
  • Julienne C. Stroeve
  • Ross A. Virginia
  • Muyin Wang
| Dec. 04, 2019

Over the past decade, the Arctic has warmed by 0.75°C, far outpacing the global average, while Antarctic temperatures have remained comparatively stable. As Earth approaches 2°C warming, the Arctic and Antarctic may reach 4°C and 2°C mean annual warming, and 7°C and 3°C winter warming, respectively. Expected consequences of increased Arctic warming include ongoing loss of land and sea ice, threats to wildlife and traditional human livelihoods, increased methane emissions, and extreme weather at lower latitudes.

Adoption of the Paris Agreement

Wikimedia CC/UNclimatechange

Journal Article - Science

Double Counting and the Paris Agreement Rulebook

    Authors:
  • Lambert Schneider
  • Maosheng Duan
  • Kelley Kizzier
  • Derik Broekhoff
  • Frank Jotzo
  • Harald Winkler
  • Michael Lazarus
  • Andrew Howard
  • Christina Hood
| Oct. 11, 2019

The authors highlight why resolving double counting — counting the same emission reduction more than once to achieve climate mitigation targets — is critical for achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement and identify essential ingredients for a robust outcome that ensures environmental effectiveness and facilitates cost-effective mitigation.