Articles

65 Items

Magazine Article - The Economist

Seeds of Change: Calestous Juma died on December 15th

| Jan. 11, 2018

Colleagues said he tweeted more than any professor they knew, and Calestous Juma’s tweets covered a swarm of things. Income inequality, and a free-trade area for Africa, you might expect. Those were the subjects he taught at Harvard: getting poorer countries, especially in Africa, to grow and thrive was the obsession of his life. But he also tweeted about a wheelchair that could climb stairs, the increasing size of steaks, and the maximum number of goats seen eating up in a tree. He was extra-delighted to send out a New York Times editorial, from 1878, about Thomas Edison’s new “aerophone”: “Something ought to be done about Mr Edison, and there is a growing conviction that it had better be done with a hemp rope.”

Calestous Juma

Martha Stewart/HKS

Newspaper Article - The New York Times

Calestous Juma, 64, Dies; Sought Innovation in African Agriculture

    Author:
  • Adeel Hassan
| Jan. 01, 2018

Calestous Juma, a prominent global advocate for sustainable development in struggling countries, particularly in his native Africa, could trace his passion for technological innovation to his arduous childhood in colonial Kenya.

Calestous Juma

Martha Stewart/HKS

Newspaper Article - The Boston Globe

Calestous Juma, 64, Champion of Sustainable International Development

    Author:
  • Bryan Marquard
| Dec. 22, 2017

A professor of the practice of international development, and a writer of great range, Calestous Juma promoted technology for the poor and vulnerable throughout the world. He also wrote a book explaining why people are wary of innovation, and delighted his more than 100,000 Twitter followers by retweeting cartoons that ribbed those who are resistant to science.

Journal Article - Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability

Sociotechnical Systems and Sustainability: Current and Future Perspectives for Inclusive Development

| February 2017

Sociotechnical systems — for example, telecommunication networks, electric grids, large-scale manufacturing systems — are interacting ensembles of engineered artifacts embedded in society, linked with economies, and connected with ecology. Such systems have been analyzed through the lenses of sustainability (largely along the dimensions of environmental protection and affordability), carrying influence in the literatures of technology innovation, product design, infrastructure planning, and service delivery. Sustainability concerns along the environmental and financial dimensions have motivated focus on waste and emissions reduction, new technology development, and greening of industrial ecosystems. The concept of inclusive development, however, has not yet permeated the research or conceptualization of sociotechnical systems.

Earth at night, 2012. People around the world depend upon electric lighting. Generating electricity using increased amounts of non-fossil fuels is critical to slowing climate change.

USA.gov

Journal Article - Ecological Economics

Using Inclusive Wealth for Policy Evaluation: Application to Electricity Infrastructure Planning in Oil-Exporting Countries

| 2017

Decision-makers often seek to design policies that support sustainable development. Prospective evaluations of how effectively such policies are likely to meet sustainability goals have nonetheless remained relatively challenging. Evaluating policies against sustainability goals can be facilitated through the inclusive wealth framework, which characterizes development in terms of the value to society of its underlying capital assets, and defines development to be potentially sustainable if that value does not decline over time.

Magazine Article - Global South Development Magazine

A Few Thoughts on Engineering Peaceful and Inclusive Societies

| November 3, 2016

"The rise of nations such as South Korea, Singapore and China as global economic players illustrated the importance of expanding and deepening human competence. A key starting point in the growth process is recognising that building engineering capabilities offered the best opportunity for technological leapfrogging and catch-up in a variety of industries."

Journal Article - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

Making Technological Innovation Work for Sustainable Development

| August 12, 2016

This article sets forth the authors' perspective on how technological innovation can better advance the goals of sustainable development. The authors seek to help bridge the gap between scholarship and practice by drawing from conceptual research, empirical cases, and real-world experience to highlight practical guidelines for use by practicing scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, and policy advocates.

A rural stove using biomass cakes, fuelwood and trash as cooking fuel... It is a major source of air pollution in India, and produces smoke and numerous indoor air pollutants at concentrations 5 times higher than coal.

Wikipedia

Journal Article - Nature Energy

Energy decisions reframed as justice and ethical concerns

| 6 May 2016

Many energy consumers, and even analysts and policymakers, confront and frame energy and climate risks in a moral vacuum, rarely incorporating broader social justice concerns. Here, to remedy this gap, we investigate how concepts from justice and ethics can inform energy decision-making by reframing five energy problems — nuclear waste, involuntary resettlement, energy pollution, energy poverty and climate change — as pressing justice concerns.

Oil Pump Jack between Seminole and Andrews, West Texas

Paul Lowry, Creative Commons

Newspaper Article - The Wall Street Journal

What Will the U.S. Energy Industry Look Like Over the Next Five Years?

| November 15, 2015

Professor Meghan O'Sullivan was interviewed on November 15th, 2015 for a Wall Street Journal special section on energy, discussing the rapid transformation of the American energy sector in light of low fuel prices, new climate policies and other factors.

A Chinese power plant.

CC-BY-SA-3.0

Journal Article - Nature

Reduced Carbon Emission Estimates from Fossil Fuel Combustion and Cement Production in China

    Authors:
  • Dabo Guan
  • Wei Wei
  • Steven J Davis
  • Philippe Ciais
  • Jin Bai
  • Shushi Peng
  • Qiang Zhang
  • Klaus Hubacek
  • Gregg Marland
  • Robert J. Andres
  • Douglas Crawford-Brown
  • Jintai Lin
  • Hongyan Zhao
  • Chaopeng Hong
  • Thomas A. Boden
  • Kuishuang Feng
  • Glen P. Peters
  • Fengming Xi
  • Junguo Liu
  • Yuan Li
  • Yu Zhao
  • Ning Zeng
  • Kebin He
| August 2015

The authors findings suggest that overestimation of China's emissions in 2000–2013 may be larger than China's estimated total forest sink in 1990–2007 or China's land carbon sink in 2000–2009.The revisions of the Chinese emissions are substantial enough that they may lead to adjustments in the Global Carbon Cycle.