News & Announcements

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Robert Stavins

Martha Stewart

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements

Harvard Project's Robert Stavins is Co-recipient of the Publication of Enduring Quality Award

June 13, 2017

The Publication of Enduring Quality award of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists (AERE) recognizes works that are of seminal nature and with enduring value in environmental and resource economics. This year, AERE recognized two influential empirical papers on induced innovation in environmental economics: “The Induced Innovation Hypothesis and Energy-Saving Technological Change,” by Richard G. Newell, Adam B. Jaffe, and Robert N. Stavins, Quarterly Journal of Economics, Vol. 114, No. 3 (1999), pp. 941-975; and "Induced Innovation and Energy Prices," by David Popp, American Economic Review, Vol. 92, No. 1 (2002), pp. 160–180.

U.S. President Barack Obama gets direction from White House science adviser John Holdren during an event to look at the stars with local middle school students and astronomers from across the country on the South Lawn at the White House in Washington.

Jim Young/Reuters

Press Release - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Presidential Science Advisor John Holdren Returns to the Belfer Center

| Feb. 15, 2017

John Holdren, the longest-serving White House science advisor in history, is returning to Harvard Kennedy School and the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. Effective today, John will again be the Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy at Harvard Kennedy School and will join Dan Schrag in co-directing the Center’s Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy.

News

What’s at Stake in Paris - Diplomacy & Policy at the Climate Change Talks

Nov. 22, 2015

Opening the joint CLIMATE CHANGE DIPLOMACY WEEK event series, speakers and leading climate change experts from both Harvard and beyond participated in a panel discussion titled "What's at Stake in Paris?: Diplomacy and Policy at the Climate Change Talks," moderated by the Future of Diplomacy Project Faculty Director, R. Nicholas Burns, and co-hosted with the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements on November 9. The speakers comprised of Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology at Harvard University, Daniel Schrag;former Costa Rican Minister of Environment and Energy, René Castro; former Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs and chief climate negotiator, Paula Dobriansky; and Albert Pratt Professor of Business and Government and Director of the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Robert Stavins. Together panellists weighed in on the upcoming UNFCCC talks to be held in Paris in December and the overarching policy issues at play.

MCC Director Ottmar Edenhoffer listens as Harvard Professor Martin Weitzman speaks on climate economics on May 28, 2014, in Berlin.

MCC Photo

News - Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, Belfer Center

Harvard Professor Martin Weitzman Gives Lecture in Berlin

    Author:
  • Bryan Galcik
| June 4, 2014

Harvard Project on Climate Agreements collaborator and Professor of Economics at Harvard University Martin Weitzman discussed the potential of carbon taxes and cap-and-trade programs to deal with climate change. He also expressed his concerns regarding geoengineering.

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Putting a Price on Nature

| October 10, 2013

Planting a forest to improve air quality may prove to be as cost-effective as expensive new pollution control equipment, according to preliminary results from a novel experiment at a Freeport, Texas chemical plant. Officials involved in the study say this innovative approach could become a test case before the federal Environmental Protection Agency, which has identified reforestation as a potential air quality improvement strategy.

Leaders of an unusual collaboration between The Nature Conservancy, the world's largest conservation group, and the Dow Chemical Company, a Fortune 100 corporation, told a Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) audience this week that they were encouraged by initial findings validating a dollars-and-cents approach to valuing nature that may help businesses with their bottom line while improving the environment in local communities.

Dow-TNC pilot site at Dow’s facility in Freeport, Texas, the company’s largest manufacturing facility.

Jennifer Molnar, TNC

News - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Dow Chemical-Nature Conservancy Collaboration to Receive Harvard Kennedy School’s 2013 Roy Family Award for Environmental Partnership

| October 2, 2013

The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University will present the 2013 Roy Family Award for Environmental Partnership on October 7 to The Dow Chemical Company and The Nature Conservancy for their groundbreaking collaborative work to incorporate the value of natural resources into the business bottom line.

To celebrate the award, leaders of Dow and TNC will take part in a panel discussion at Harvard Kennedy School Monday, October 7 at 5:00 pm to describe their development of tools and models to integrate the value of forests, watersheds, and biodiversity into more sustainable business and community decisions. The panel, “Valuing Nature: Saving Ecosystems is Good Business,” will also detail steps that other corporations and NGOs can take to protect our natural resources as businesses continue to grow.

News

New Study: "The Shale Oil Boom: a U.S. Phenomenon"

| June 27, 2013

CAMBRIDGE, MA – The dramatic surge in U.S. shale oil production could more than triple the current American output of shale oil to five million barrels a day by 2017, which would likely make the United States the No. 1 oil producer in the world, according to a new study by a researcher at Harvard Kennedy School.

Leonardo Maugeri, a former oil industry executive from Italy who is a fellow at the Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, studied the performance of 4,000 American shale oil wells and the work of about 100 companies involved in shale oil production.

In a paper titled “The Shale Oil Boom: A U.S. Phenomenon,” Maugeri wrote that the unique characteristics of shale oil production are ideal for the United States -- and unlikely to be mirrored elsewhere in the world. These factors include the availability of drilling rigs, and the entrepreneurial nature of the American exploration and production  industry,  both critical for the thousands of wells required for shale oil exploitation.

In this Friday, July 17, 2009 file photo, an Iraqi worker operates valves at the Nahran Omar oil refinery near the city of Basra, 340 miles (550 kilometers) southeast of Baghdad, Iraq.

(AP Photo/Nabil al-Jurani, File)

Press Release - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

New study by Harvard Kennedy School researcher forecasts sharp increase in world oil production capacity, and risk of price collapse

| June 2012

A new study by Belfer Center fellow Leonardo Maugeri shows that oil production capacity is surging in the United States and several other countries at such a fast pace that global oil output capacity is likely to grow by nearly 20 percent by 2020. This could prompt a plunge or even a collapse in oil prices. The findings by Maugeri, a former oil industry executive who is now a fellow in the Geopolitics of Energy Project in the Kennedy School’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, are based on an original field-by-field analysis of the world’s major oil formations and exploration projects.

Natural Gas as a Bridge to the Future

Photo by Marcus Halevi

News

Natural Gas as a Bridge to the Future

    Author:
  • Dominic Contreras
| Apr. 11, 2012

On Monday April 9, the Belfer Center’s Environment and Natural Resources Program (ENRP) hosted a screening and discussion of Hefner’s latest project, a documentary titled “The Grand Energy Transition: Natural Gas – The Bridge To Our Sustainable Future.” Excerpts from the film were shown at the Kennedy School to an audience including Belfer Center Director Graham Allison and Harvard University Distinguished Service Professor Joseph S. Nye.

(See link below for audio podcast of the event)