Reports & Papers

12 Items

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Ensuring Strategic Stability in the Past and Present: Theoretical and Applied Questions

    Author:
  • Andrei A. Kokoshin
| June 2011

In the Foreword to this paper by Andrei Kokoshin, Belfer Center Director Graham Allison writes: "The global nuclear order is reaching a tipping point. Several trends are advancing along crooked paths, each undermining this order. These trends include North Korea’s expanding nuclear weapons program, Iran’s continuing nuclear ambitions, Pakistan’s increasing instability, growing doubts about the sustainability of the nonproliferation regime in general, and terrorist groups’ enduring aspirations to acquire nuclear weapons. Andrei Kokoshin, deputy of the State Duma and former secretary of Russia’s Security Council, analyzes these challenges that threaten to cause the nuclear order to collapse in the following paper."

Windmills generating electricity for South Africa's electric company Eskom seen near Brackenfell on the outskirts of Cape Town, South Africa,  Jan 29, 2008.

AP Photo

Discussion Paper - Energy Technology Innovation Policy Project, Belfer Center

Governmental Energy Innovation Investments, Policies and Institutions in the Major Emerging Economies: Brazil, Russia, India, Mexico, China, and South Africa

Over the past decade, countries with emerging economies like Brazil, Russia, India, Mexico, China, and South Africa have become important global players in political and economic domains. In 2007, these six countries consumed and produced more than a third of the world's energy and emitted about 35 percent of total greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions. The changing global energy landscape has important implications for energy technology innovation (ETI) nationally and internationally. However, there is limited information available about the investments and initiatives that are taking place by the national governments within these countries. This paper presents the information available on energy RD&D investments in the emerging economies. 

An Indian woman dries cow dung cakes for use as cooking fuel in Phoolpur village, about 45 kilometers east of Allahabad, India, June 8, 2008.

AP Photo

Discussion Paper - Energy Technology Innovation Policy Project, Belfer Center

The Status of Rural Energy Access in India: A Synthesis

| August 2010

India's energy crisis is defined by the fact that the major share of its rural population is energy poor. Energy poverty, indicated by the lack of access to modern energy services, is a direct outcome of income poverty. The poor cannot afford to pay for the services of the modern energy carriers and they live in sub-standard buildings/houses, which are unfit to be connected to the modern energy systems. Similarly, any poor nation will be constrained by inadequate access to both energy and financial resources, and therefore will be unable to build an adequate infrastructure that would facilitate connectivity to modern energy carriers.

People from rural India demanding equitable distribution of energy carry lanterns as they stage a protest outside the Indian Social Justice Ministry in New Delhi, India, Nov. 18, 2009.

AP Photo

Discussion Paper - Energy Technology Innovation Policy Project, Belfer Center

Modern Energy Access to All in Rural India: An Integrated Implementation Strategy

| August 2010

Expanding energy access to the rural population of India presents a critical challenge for its government. The presence of about 364 million people without access to electricity and about 726 million who rely on biomass for cooking indicate both the failure of past policies and programs, and the dire need is for a radical redesign of the current system that will address the need to expand energy access for these people.

Paper - Pew Center on Global Climate Change

Positioning the Indian Coal-Power Sector for Carbon Mitigation: Key Policy Options

| January 2009

The domestic and international steps outlined in this paper could greatly advance the development and implementation of a GHG-mitigation strategy in the Indian coal-power sector, while allowing the sector to contribute suitably to the country’s energy needs. The key to success will be adopting a deliberate approach, with short- and long-term perspectives in mind, that allows for the development of an integrated energy and climate policy.

A coal wagon sits at the railway station in Varanasi, India.

Carsten Karl

Discussion Paper - Energy Technology Innovation Policy Project, Belfer Center

Cleaner Power in India: Towards a Clean-Coal-Technology Roadmap

| Winter 2007/08

Investigating the role of coal in India's energy sector, Chikkatur and Sagar emphasize the need for a technology roadmapping process. They highlight the interlinkages between technology innovation and public policy and provide an analytical framework to help delineate the kinds of questions that scholars and practitioners need to ask in addressing India's coal sector.

Paper - Energy Technology Innovation Policy Project, Belfer Center

Developing Better Policies for the Sustainable Development of the Indian Coal Sector

| November 20, 2007

Coal accounts for about 70% of total electricity generation in India and is likely to remain a key energy source for at least the next 30-40 years. An increase in India's use of coal resources for its energy supply must occur through environmentally and socially sustainable development of this sector.

Discussion Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Assessment of Advanced Coal-Based Electricity Generation Technology Options for India: Potential Learning from U.S. Experiences

| September 2005

India has huge domestic reserves of coal and predominantly depends on coal-based electricity generation to meet a substantial portion of its electricity generation requirements.