Asia & the Pacific

145 Items

US president Joe Biden is about to board Air Force One Boeing 747 airplane after the US - Russia summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, on Geneva Airport Cointrin, on June 16, 2021.

MARTIAL TREZZINI/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Analysis & Opinions - Social Europe Journal

Defending democratic values

| June 09, 2021

The United States president, Joe Biden, has made restoring alliances and partnerships a central feature of his foreign-policy agenda. As he arrives in Europe for the first overseas trip of his presidency, the time is ripe for the transatlantic relationship to advance an agenda of democratic resilience.

Strengthening policy co-ordination on Russia and China will be central to this agenda—although transatlantic partners are not expected to be in lockstep with him on every issue. Instead of lamenting where our approaches toward Moscow and Beijing may diverge, however, the US and its European partners should take advantage of renewed diplomatic engagement to make progress on defending democratic values at home and abroad.

(Left-to-right) The Chinese, US, and EU flags overlapping

Thorsten Kirchhoff

Analysis & Opinions - Internationale Politik Quarterly

A Common Front on China? A View from the United States

| Mar. 31, 2021

Strengthening transatlantic democracies requires even more focus and attention today because of the complex interdependence that exists between our countries and China, not in spite of it. Recognizing that we must safeguard liberal democracy from authoritarian influence is not a retroactive worldview, nor is it the basis of an anti-China agenda. Rather, a shared commitment to renewing our democracies is an enduring feature of the transatlantic relationship and should remain so in the years ahead. 

Nicholas Burns on CNN

CNN

Analysis & Opinions - CNN

Burns: Putin Doesn’t Deserve to be on the Same Stage as President Joe Biden

| Mar. 19, 2021

"President Biden was right to say what he said: President Putin is an autocrat, and Russia is now an authoritarian dictatorial country." Ambassador Nicholas Burns, Former U.S. Ambassador to NATO, talks about the US's allies and adversaries around the world. 

President Joseph R. Biden, Jr. delivers remarks at the State Department

State Department Photo by Freddie Everett

Analysis & Opinions - PRI's The World

Biden's reentry on the foreign policy stage

| Feb. 25, 2021

The first 100 days are key to understanding where any presidency is going. Now more than a third of the way into that timeframe, how is President Joe Biden doing in the international policy arena? The World’s host Marco Werman speaks with Nicholas Burns, a former US under secretary of state for political affairs and a former ambassador to NATO.

US President Elect Joe Biden and the European Council

Facebook

Analysis & Opinions - The Wall Street Journal

Here’s Where Biden Will Face Early Foreign-Policy Decisions

| Nov. 30, 2020

When it comes to president-elect Joe Biden’s foreign policy in Asia, Europe and Latin America, he is likely to focus on issues like transatlantic cooperation, U.S.-China relations and immigration. Ambassador Nicholas Burns and WSJ journalists examine the impact a Biden administration could have on U.S. allies around the world. 

European Commission Ursula von der Leyen speaks at the EU-China leaders' meeting

REUTERS/Yves Herman

Analysis & Opinions - Internationale Politik Quarterly

Bonding over Beijing

| Oct. 02, 2020

Over the past few years, China’s rise has become a top priority in Washington and in many European capitals—and a big-ticket item on the wider transatlantic agenda. However, the United States and Europe have so far not been able to capitalize on this convergence by building anything resembling a coherent agenda to address jointly shared challenges from China. This task will be among the most pressing on the transatlantic agenda over the next four years. 

Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs

The Brookings Institution

Analysis & Opinions - Brookings Institution

The Kremlin’s Disinformation Playbook Goes to Beijing

| May 19, 2020

The coronavirus pandemic is laying bare a growing competition between democratic and authoritarian governments. As the U.S. and Europe struggle to contain the virus at home, Russia and China are seizing the moment to enhance their international influence through information operations. Moscow and Beijing have long aimed to weaken the United States, blunt the appeal of democratic institutions, and sow divisions across the West. Their goals in this crisis are no different.