Asia & the Pacific

30 Items

The U.S. Capitol is seen at sunrise, in Washington, October 10, 2017

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Protecting Democracy in an Era of Cyber Information War

| February 2019

Citizens voluntarily carry Big Brother and his relatives in their pockets. Along with big data and artificial intelligence, technology has made the problem of defending democracy from information warfare far more complicated than foreseen two decades ago. And while rule of law, trust, truth and openness make democracies asymmetrically vulnerable, they are also critical values to defend.  Any policy to defend against cyber information war must start with the Hippocratic oath: first, do no harm.

Dec. 9, 2016 file photo: President-elect Donald Trump arrives to speak to supporters during a rally, in Grand Rapids, Mich. Trump is facing an early test with fellow Republicans over U.S. relations with Russia.

AP

Analysis & Opinions - CNN

It'll be Trump's Job to Face Facts on Russia Hack

| December 12, 2016

"The Trump camp's insistence that the intelligence is not worthy of a deep dive has put it squarely in opposition to a fact-based inquiry supported by scores of nonpartisan intelligence professionals. The consequences of Trump's posture are dangerous for his governing in the future (and are a bit of an insult to those who risk their lives to get information for his daily briefings, which he doesn't attend)."

Analysis & Opinions - Aljazeera

The Kremlin and the US Election

| December 6, 2016

"But what about deterring operations that are not equivalent to an armed attack? There are grey areas in which important targets, say, a free political process, are not strategically vital in the same way as the electrical grid or the financial system. Destroying the latter two could damage lives and property; interference with the former threatens deeply held political values."

Russian President Vladimir Putin gestures while speaking at a meeting of the Presidential Council for strategic development in the Kremlin, Moscow, Nov. 25, 2016. Putin is projecting Russian military power overseas on a scale unseen since Soviet times.

AP

Analysis & Opinions - The National Interest

The Good News and the Bad

| November 28, 2016

"Putin's strategy of intervention in neighboring countries and the Middle East, and his cyber meddling is designed to make Russia look great again, but is making their situation worse in the long run. Declining countries often take more risks and are thus more dangerous—witness the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1914."

Analysis & Opinions - The Diplomat

Can China Be Deterred in Cyber Space?

| February 3, 2016

"Along with punishment and denial, entanglement is an important means of making an actor perceive that the costs of an action will exceed the benefits.  Entanglement refers to the existence of  interdependences which makes a successful attack simultaneously impose serious costs on the attacker as well as the victim. This is not unique to cyber. For example, in 2009, when the People's Liberation Army urged the Chinese government to dump some of China's massive holdings of dollar reserves to punish the United States for selling arms to Taiwan, the Central Bank pointed out that this would impose large costs on China as well and the government decided against it."

Analysis & Opinions - The Washington Post

The World Needs an Arms-control Treaty for Cybersecurity

| October 1, 2015

"...[I]t is worth remembering that the first nuclear-arms control agreements — the Test Ban Treaty of 1963 and the Non-Proliferation Treaty of 1968 — did not solve all of the problems of controlling nuclear weapons. Rather, they started a process. Perhaps Obama and Xi's modest beginning will do something similar."

Analysis & Opinions - The Huffington Post

Is Cybersecurity Like Arms Control?

| May 18, 2015

"In little more than a generation, the Internet has become the substrate of the global economy and governance worldwide. Several billion more human users will be added in the next decade, as will tens of billions of devices, ranging from thermostats to industrial control systems (the 'Internet of Things'). All of this burgeoning interdependence implies vulnerabilities that governments and non-governmental actors can exploit. At the same time, we are only beginning to come to terms with the national-security implications of this. Strategic studies of the cyber domain resemble nuclear strategy in the 1950s: analysts are still not clear about the meaning of offense, defense, deterrence, escalation, norms, and arms control."

Parody of Sony's trade mark+logo after having been hacked, April 14, 2012.

Wikimedia CC

Analysis & Opinions - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

The Comedy of Errors

| December 23, 2014

"Although Sony has nothing to do with the U.S. Government, and Hollywood has dramatized world leaders before (such as Charles de Gaulle in Day of the Jackal), it seems appropriate to pose the following question: whoever, individually or collectively, came up with the idea of putting together a film, even a farce, which includes an assassination by the Central Intelligence Agency of a living world leader, namely Kim Jong Eun of North Korea?"