Asia & the Pacific

73 Items

Police vehicle checkpoint in China

(AP Photo/Andy Wong)

Journal Article - Quarterly Journal: International Security

Counterterrorism and Preventive Repression: China’s Changing Strategy in Xinjiang

    Authors:
  • Sheena Chestnut Greitens
  • Myunghee Lee
  • Emir Yazici
| Winter 2019/20

The Chinese Communist Party changed its internal security strategy in Xinjiang in early 2017 because of Beijing’s changing perception of Uyghur involvement in transnational Islamic militancy abroad, which heightened perceived domestic vulnerability to terrorism.

Magazine Article - Le Figaro

Les États-Unis et La Chine Se Dirigent Tout Droit Vers La Guerre

| May 03, 2019

Le piège de Thucydides se met en place quand une puissance émergente vient défier la puissance régnante. Ainsi hier Athènes face à Sparte. Et peut-être demain Pékin face à Washington. Telle est la thèse de Graham Allison, professeur émérite à Harvard et conseiller de plusieurs secrétaires d'État à la Défense, dans son livre devenu un best-seller mondial.

(The Thucydides Trap takes place when an emerging power threatens to displace a ruling one. Long ago, in antiquity, it was Athens against Sparta. But tomorrow, it could be Beijing against Washington. Such is the argument made by Graham Allison, emeritus professor at Harvard and advisor to several Secretaries of Defense, in his best-selling book Destined for War: Can America and China Escape the Thucydides Trap? - This English translation from original French by Christian Gibbons, Belfer Center)

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (left) and Philippine Secretary of National Defense Voltaire Gazmin (right) shake hands on a Marine Corps V-22 Osprey as they depart the USS Stennis after touring the aircraft carrier as it sails the South China Sea April 15, 2016.

SMSgt Adrian Cadiz / DoD

Report

Reflections on American Grand Strategy in Asia

| October 2018

To understand how I approached China during my time as Secretary, it’s important to note that I don’t see U.S. strategy in Asia as centered on China at all. I said many times: We don’t have a China policy, we have an Asia policy. The heart of that policy is a mesh of political, diplomatic, economic, and military relationships with many nations that has sustained security and underwritten an extraordinary leap in economic development.

During my time as Secretary, I referred to this structure over and over as the “principled, inclusive network.” Enunciating and reinforcing its strategic and military dimensions in a rapidly changing security environment was my constant priority as Secretary of Defense. Even amid pressing challenges such as the fight against ISIS and the need to confront Russian aggression, no other issue I dealt with had such lasting implications for our national security and prosperity.

My three-word title for this policy was admittedly not very catchy. But my counterparts in the region understood it. They understood that all three words have been essential to its success and will remain essential to its future.

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- Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School Belfer Center Newsletter

International Security - Vol. 42 No. 3, Winter 2017/18

Spring 2018

A sampling of articles in the Winter 2017/18 issue of the Belfer Center's journal International Security.

International Security is America’s leading journal of security affairs. The International Security journal is edited at Harvard Kennedy School’s Belfer Center and published quarterly by the MIT Press. Questions may be directed to IS@harvard.edu.