Asia & the Pacific

181 Items

Graham Allison on Bloomberg

Bloomberg

News - Bloomberg

China May Be On Collision Course with U.S., Harvard's Allison Says

| Oct. 04, 2018

Graham Allison, Douglas Dillon Professor of Government at Harvard Kennedy School, said in an interview with Bloomberg that China is rivaling the U.S. in virtually every domain. Because of the dynamic between these two powers, Allison warned that the future will be "extremely dangerous."

Dr. Gary Samore, Ambassadors Danny Russel and Chris Hill, and Dr. John Park offer their insights on U.S.-North Korean relations. 

Benn Craig/Belfer Center

News - Harvard Kennedy School

Dealing With North Korea: Insights From U.S. Negotiators

    Author:
  • Nora Delaney
| June 21, 2018

The historic summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore this month (June 12) has drawn both skepticism and optimism from experts. A panel of senior American and South Korean diplomats with experience negotiating with North Korea weighed in at an event hosted by the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs’ Korea Working Group on Tuesday (June 19).

Belfer Center Director Ash Carter, right, speaks with The Asia Group's Richard Verma, left, a former U.S. ambassador to India, and Kurt M. Campbell, center, a Belfer Center Senior Fellow and former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asia and the Pacific, for The Tea Leaves podcast. (Credit: The Asia Group)

The Asia Group

News - The Tea Leaves

Ash Carter Discusses China, India, and Strategy on The Asia Group's "Tea Leaves" Podcast

| Apr. 16, 2018

Belfer Center Director Ash Carter joined Kurt M. Campbell and Richard Verma of The Asia Group on "The Tea Leaves" podcast to discuss his tenure at the Pentagon, the dynamism of the Indo-Pacific, and the challenges the United States faces in the region. Carter drew on his 35-year career working on defense and technology to hone in on critical issues, including the rise of China, strategy and policymaking, and partnering with India.

Nicholas Burns speaks at Bates College on March 29

Theophil Syslo/Bates College

News - Bates College

Former NATO Ambassador: Global Leadership is More Important Than Ever

| Mar. 30, 2018

The essence of global politics today, said career diplomat and Harvard professor Nicholas Burns in a speech at Bates College, is that no country can go it alone.

Issues like climate change, public health crises, the threat of chemical and nuclear weapons, and cyber attacks are transnational problems requiring transnational solutions. But while a global mindset is more necessary than ever, the United States’ highest leaders are drawing back from the world.

“We’re led by the first president since the 1920s who doesn’t believe that the United States has a fundamental responsibility to help the world be knit together, to be the first responders, to cope with the big problems and the small problems,” Burns said to a Bates audience on March 29.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson listens as President Donald Trump announces that the United States will designate North Korea a state sponsor of terrorism during a cabinet meeting at the White House, Monday, Nov. 20, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

News - The Economist

Donald Trump May Be Bluffing Over a Pre-Emptive Strike on North Korea

    Author:
  • David Rennie
| Jan. 25, 2018

The last time that America almost risked a pre-emptive strike on North Korea the gamble offered a spectacular pay-off. Ashton Carter, a leading architect of that plan, recalls that his scheme for bombing the Yongbyon nuclear facility in 1994 assumed that in one or two days the entirety of the regime’s nuclear programme could be levelled and entombed in rubble. Mr Carter, who went on to become defence secretary in the Obama administration, now thinks that an American first strike would only put “a significant dent” in North Korea’s arsenal of nuclear devices and bombmaking sites. “The difference today is that the North Koreans are very good at hiding, burying and moving around their nuclear infrastructure,” says Mr Carter, now at Harvard University.