Asia & the Pacific

287 Items

The U.S. Capitol is seen at sunrise, in Washington, October 10, 2017

AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Paper - Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School

Protecting Democracy in an Era of Cyber Information War

| February 2019

Citizens voluntarily carry Big Brother and his relatives in their pockets. Along with big data and artificial intelligence, technology has made the problem of defending democracy from information warfare far more complicated than foreseen two decades ago. And while rule of law, trust, truth and openness make democracies asymmetrically vulnerable, they are also critical values to defend.  Any policy to defend against cyber information war must start with the Hippocratic oath: first, do no harm.

Russia's Energy Foray into Asia: Implications for U.S. Interests

kees torn/Flickr

Paper - National Bureau of Asian Research

Russia's Energy Foray into Asia: Implications for U.S. Interests

This essay examines Russia’s growing role in Asia’s energy markets, assesses the implications for the U.S., and examines the claim that closer Sino-Russian energy ties are adding new incentives for a broader strategic alignment.

Secretary of Defense Ash Carter (left) and Philippine Secretary of National Defense Voltaire Gazmin (right) shake hands on a Marine Corps V-22 Osprey as they depart the USS Stennis after touring the aircraft carrier as it sails the South China Sea April 15, 2016.

SMSgt Adrian Cadiz / DoD

Report

Reflections on American Grand Strategy in Asia

| October 2018

To understand how I approached China during my time as Secretary, it’s important to note that I don’t see U.S. strategy in Asia as centered on China at all. I said many times: We don’t have a China policy, we have an Asia policy. The heart of that policy is a mesh of political, diplomatic, economic, and military relationships with many nations that has sustained security and underwritten an extraordinary leap in economic development.

During my time as Secretary, I referred to this structure over and over as the “principled, inclusive network.” Enunciating and reinforcing its strategic and military dimensions in a rapidly changing security environment was my constant priority as Secretary of Defense. Even amid pressing challenges such as the fight against ISIS and the need to confront Russian aggression, no other issue I dealt with had such lasting implications for our national security and prosperity.

My three-word title for this policy was admittedly not very catchy. But my counterparts in the region understood it. They understood that all three words have been essential to its success and will remain essential to its future.

A satellite view of the Gansu Dunhuang Solar Park, a photovoltaic power station under construction in Gansu Provence, as seen on June 9, 2018.

DigitalGlobe, CNES/Airbus, Google Earth, used with permission

Report - Environment and Natural Resources Program, Belfer Center

Harvard-Tsinghua Workshop on Low-Carbon Development and Public Policy

| September 2018

The Belfer Center’s Environment and Natural Resources Program and the Center for Science, Technology, and Education Policy at Tsinghua University held the fifth annual Tsinghua-Harvard Workshop on Low-Carbon Development and Public Policy. This event brought together leading experts on climate and energy from academic, business, and government communities in both the United States and China. This year’s workshop focused on electricity systems and renewable energy penetration.

A Tesla Model 3 charges using a Mobile Charger 2.0, 29 July 2017.

Steve Jurvetson

Paper - Environment and Natural Resources Program, Belfer Center

Charging the Future

| September 2018

Electric vehicles (EVs) have advanced significantly this decade, owing in part to decreasing battery costs. Yet EVs remain more costly than gasoline fueled vehicles over their useful life. This paper analyzes the additional advances that will be needed, if electric vehicles are to significantly penetrate the passenger vehicle fleet.

Smoke rises above the skyline of Beijing on a moderately polluted day, Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein

Paper - Environment and Natural Resources Program, Belfer Center

High-resolution Carbon Emissions Data for Chinese Cities

| August 2018

China is currently the world’s largest energy consumer and CO2 emitter, and its cities contribute 85% of the total CO2 emissions in China. Given the magnitude and growth rate of Chinese cities’ carbon emissions, cities are considered to be the key areas for implementing policies designed to adapt to climate change and mitigate CO2 emissions.

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Paper - Institute of Nuclear Materials Management

On China's Closed Fuel Cycle Strategies

| July 2018

As it expands its fleet of nuclear power plants, China faces an important decision: whether to make large capital investments in facilities to reprocess spent nuclear fuel and recycle the resulting plutonium in fast neutron reactors, or continue to store nuclear fuel, leaving for the future decisions on whether to reprocess the fuel or dispose of it as waste. In reaching a decision, policymakers should consider financial costs, the available fuel supply, nuclear security and proliferation risks, health and environmental dangers, and spent fuel management issues. This paper will first discuss the status of China’s breeder reactors and civilian reprocessing programs. It will then examine the costs and fuel supply issues associated with reprocessing.

Report - Asia Society Policy Institute

Carbon Market Cooperation in Northeast Asia: Assessing Challenges and Overcoming Barriers

    Editor:
  • Jackson Ewing
| July 2018

This report includes 11 chapters that examine the challenges of and approaches to carbon market cooperation and linkage in Northeast Asia. The report begins with four chapters focused on the status of carbon markets in the region, with examinations of how legal and institutional frameworks can facilitate the varying national and local measures employed to strengthen links and yield dividends. Chapters five through seven describe the barriers to linkage, and the uneven impacts — whether positive or negative — of linkage across the region, and also identify opportunities to pursue other forms of non-traditional linkage pathways. The remainder of the report is organized around the particularities of emissions trading system policies and goals in China and Japan, with the final chapter making the case for the importance of business sector involvement in linkage efforts.

Report Chapter - Asia Society Policy Institute

The Paris Agreement's Article 6 and Cooperation in Northeast Asia to Address Climate Change

    Author:
  • Robert C. Stowe
| July 2018

This chapter explores how Article 6 of the Paris Agreement may support international cooperation to address climate change, with particular reference to Northeast Asia. The chapter focuses especially on Article 6.2, which provides the opportunity for countries to apply emissions reductions from other jurisdictions to the attainment of their own nationally determined contributions.

In this May 2, 2016 photo, People’s Liberation Army veteran Zhao Shunli uses a rear view mirror to refine his look at his home in Luoyang in central China’s Henan province.

AP Photo/Ng Han Guan

Paper

Taking History as a Mirror

| June 2018

This report goes beyond the headlines to analyze Xi’s foreign policy discourse. It uses historical analysis of official strategies to suggest that there may be more continuity than commonly assumed between Chinese foreign policy under Xi and that under his predecessors. In particular, Xi has not changed the fundamental strategic orientation of China’s external relations in the post-Mao era: “Opening” and “Peace and Development.”